Ancient Babylonian Medicine: Theory and Practice

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John Wiley & Sons, Jul 21, 2015 - Literary Criticism - 240 pages
Utilizing a great variety of previously unknown cuneiform tablets, Ancient Babylonian Medicine: Theory and Practice examines the way medicine was practiced by various Babylonian professionals of the 2nd and 1st millennium B.C.
  • Represents the first overview of Babylonian medicine utilizing cuneiform sources, including archives of court letters, medical recipes, and commentaries written by ancient scholars
  • Attempts to reconcile the ways in which medicine and magic were related
  • Assigns authorship to various types of medical literature that were previously considered anonymous
  • Rejects the approach of other scholars that have attempted to apply modern diagnostic methods to ancient illnesses
 

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Contents

Cover
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Medicine as Science
Hammurapis mother BM 41293+44866 copy M
2 Exorcists performing a ritual dressed
3 Clay model of a sheep liver used
Who Did What to Whom?
šutukkuhut with one woman fumigating
The Politics of Medicine
Medicine as Literature
Medicine and Philosophy
Medical Training MD or PhD?
Uruk Medical Commentaries
Medicine and Magic as Independent Approaches
An Edition of a Medical Commentary

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About the author (2015)

Markham J. Geller is Professor of Semitic Languages at University College London and Professor for the History of Science at the Free University Berlin. He is the author of Evil Demons: Canonical Utukkū Lemnūtu Incantations (2007) and Melothesia in Babylonia (2014), editor of Melammu, the Ancient World in an Age of Globalization (2014), and co-editor of Disease in Babylonia(2007) and Imagining Creation (2008).

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