Sermons, Volume 1

Front Cover
W. Colles, 1784
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Page 192 - ... rational beings; not only as rational, but social; not only as social, but immortal. Whatever violates your nature in any of these respects, cannot afford true pleasure; any more than that which undermines an essential part of the vital system can promote health. For the truth of this conclusion, we appeal not merely to the authority of religion, nor to the testimony of the aged, but to yourselves and your own experience. We...
Page 40 - I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me; and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me : my judgment was as a robe and a diadem.
Page 194 - In youth the habits of industry are most easily acquired. In youth, the incentives to it are strongest, from ambition and from duty, from emulation and hope, from all the prospects which the beginning of life affords. If, dead to these calls, you already languish in slothful inaction...
Page 175 - The vigour which it gives the mind, and the weight which it adds to character ; the generous sentiments which it breathes, the undaunted spirit which it inspires, the...
Page 137 - But a more refined and enlarged mind leaves the world behind it, feels a call for higher pleasures, and seeks them in retreat. The man of public spirit has recourse to it in order to form plans for general good ; the man of genius in order to dwell on his favourite themes ; the philosopher to pursue his discoveries ; and the saint to improve himself in grace.
Page 182 - The path of truth is a plain and safe path ; that of falsehood is a perplexing maze. After the first departure from sincerity, it is not in your power to stop. One artifice unavoidably leads on to another ; till, as the intricacy of the labyrinth increases, you are left entangled in your own snare.
Page 183 - Remember how unknown to you are the vicissitudes of the world ; and how often they, on whom ignorant and contemptuous young men once looked down with scorn, have risen to be their superiors in future years.
Page 173 - You see, that those who are born with the same advantages of fortune, are not all equally prosperous in the course of life. While some of them, by wise and steady conduct, attain distinction in the world, and pass their days with comfort and honour ; others of the same rank, by mean and vicious...
Page 176 - As in the succession of the seasons, each, by the invariable laws of Nature, affects the productions of what is next in course ; so, in human life, every period of our age, according as it is well or ill spent, influences the happiness of that which is to follow.
Page 189 - ... and one who was formed for running the fair career of life in the midst of public esteem, cut off...

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