The Life, Exile, and Conversations of the Emperor Napoleon, Volume 1

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Page 28 - ... of the English thermometer. Longwood stands on a level height, which is tolerably extensive on the eastern side, and pretty near the coast. Continual, and frequently violent gales, always blowing in the same quarter, sweep the surface of the ground. The sun, though it rarely appears, nevertheless exercises its influence on the atmosphere, which is apt to produce disorders of the liver, if due precaution be not observed. Heavy and sudden falls of rain complete the impossibility of distinguishing...
Page 198 - General-in-chief) firmly believed, up to the period of his residence at St. Helena, the story of poison having been administered to sixty invalids. The report was circulated and believed even in our army ; therefore, what answer could be given to those who triumphantly asserted, ' It is a fact, I assure you, I have it from officers who served in the French army at the time' ? Nevertheless, the whole story is false.
Page 60 - British faith will have been lost in the hospitality of the Bellerophon. " I appeal to history. It will say, that an enemy, who for twenty years...
Page 30 - Montholon, her husband, and her son, which have since been used as the Emperor's library. Detached from this part of the house, was a little square room on the ground-floor contiguous to the kitchen, which was assigned to me. My...
Page 4 - I had beheld, with tear" less eyes, the execution of those operations, by " which numbers of my countrymen were sacri" need ; and here my feelings were roused by " the mournful howling of a dog ! Certainly " at that moment I should have been easily " moved by a suppliant enemy : I could very " well imagine Achilles surrendering up the body " of Hector at the sight of Priam's tears.
Page 65 - ... be left to him. For this reason he can from time to time signify his wishes to the Admiral till the arrival of the new Governor of St. Helena, and afterwards to the latter ; and if no objection is...
Page 169 - Caporal." which was for a long time applied to Napoleon by the soldiers. How subtle is the chain which unites the most trivial circumstances to the most important events ! Perhaps this very nickname contributed to his miraculous success on his return in 1815. While he •was haranguing the first battalion, which he found it necessary to address, a voice from the ranks exclaimed, " Vive notre petit Caporal! we will never fight against him I" Little Giant, a sobriquet of Stephen A.
Page 383 - Brutus, he would have put himself to death ; if an jEsop, he would now, perhaps, have been the governor's adviser; if an ardent and zealous Christian, he would have borne his chains in the sight of God, and blessed them. As for poor Toby, he endures his misfortunes very quietly ; he stoops to his work, and spends his days in innocent tranquillity.
Page 199 - Physician-in-chief, and who were in an absolutely desperate condition, totally unfit to be removed, while the enemy was advancing, it is very true that Napoleon asked the Physician-in-chief whether it would not be an act of humanity to administer opium to them. It is also true that the physician replied, his business was to cure, and not to kill...
Page 5 - is the result of a moment — of a thought : the hostile forces advance with various combinations, they attack each other and fight for a certain time ; the critical moment arrives, a mental flash decides, and the least reserve accomplishes the object.