The Encyclopaedia Britannica: a dictionary of arts, sciences, literature and general information, Volume 17

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Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1911 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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Page 286 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the States, who are parties thereto, have the right and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.
Page 51 - King of the French by the grace of God and the will of the Nation ". Charles X abdicated in favour of his grandson and went into exile for the third and last time.
Page 80 - Majesty's arms, and who have not borne arms against the said United States: And that persons of any other description shall have free liberty to go to any part or parts of any of the thirteen United States, and therein to remain twelve months, unmolested in their endeavours to obtain the restitution of such of their estates, rights and properties as may have been confiscated...
Page 286 - States are parties, as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact : as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact, and that in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the !States who are parties thereto have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose for arresting...
Page 59 - His Catholic Majesty will permit the citizens of the United States, for the space of three years from this time, to deposit their merchandise and effects in the port of New Orleans, and to export them from thence without paying any other duty than a fair price for the hire of the stores...
Page 212 - A British subject I was born; a British subject I will die. With my utmost effort, with my latest breath, will I oppose the veiled treason which attempts by sordid means and mercenary proffers to lure our people from their allegiance.
Page 267 - Fingal, an ancient epic poem, in six books: together with several other poems, composed by Ossian the son of Fingal (London 1762); Temora, an ancient epic poem, in eight books: together with several other poems, composed by Ossian the son of Fingal. Translated from the Gaelic language, by James Macpherson (London 1763); The works of Ossian, the son of Fingal.
Page 257 - We are unalterably opposed to every measure calculated to debase our currency or impair the credit of our country. We are, therefore, opposed to the free coinage of silver, except by international agreement with the leading commercial nations of the world, which we pledge ourselves to promote, and until such agreement can be obtained the existing gold standard must be preserved.
Page 75 - Contents: — My Garden Acquaintance; A Good Word for Winter ; On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners ; A Great Public Character (Hon.
Page 161 - Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied : for though the camomile, the more it is trodden on, the faster it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.

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