The Monkey Grammarian

Front Cover
Arcade Publishing, 1981 - Fiction - 162 pages
3 Reviews
Written while Paz was the Mexican ambassador to India, this dazzling mind-journey to the temple city of Galta becomes the occasion for the celebratel Mexican poet and philosopher to explore the eternally intriguing question: is language, the concept of grammar, God-given or did man invent it on his own with powers borrowed from the divine realm?
 

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Considering that I'm a fan of mind stories, or puzzle stories, I may be able to read about this adventure to the lost temple city of Gatta. I may find this story interesting.

Review: The Monkey Grammarian

User Review  - ClauSamantha - Goodreads

Surprised by the pleasure of enjoying the translation as much as I had enjoyed the work in it s original language. Perhaps such pleasure derives from the sense-awaking way in which our Mexican ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
11
Section 4
17
Section 5
24
Section 6
35
Section 7
38
Section 8
41
Section 13
77
Section 14
82
Section 15
90
Section 16
93
Section 17
107
Section 18
116
Section 19
128
Section 20
131

Section 9
49
Section 10
58
Section 11
61
Section 12
71
Section 21
135
Section 22
153
Copyright

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About the author (1981)

Octavio Paz (1914-1998) was born in Mexico City. He wrote many volumes of poetry, as well as a prolific body of remarkable works of non ction on subjects as varied as poetics, literary and art criticism, politics, culture, and Mexican history. He was awarded the Jerusalem Prize in 1977, the Cervantes Prize in 1981, and the Neustadt Prize in 1982. He received the German Peace Prize for his political work, and finally, the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1990.

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