The Law of Nations: Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns : a Work Tending to Display the True Interest of Powers

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Thomas M. Pomroy, 1805 - International law - 563 pages
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Contents

Circumfpection ought to be ufed 221
62
Ministers of thenation or regents during an interregnum 519
64
The minister of a friendly power to be received ibid
65
Examples ibid
66
How ministers of an enemy are to be admitted 521
68
Of states called patrimonial 89
69
Origin of the feveral orders of public ministers 423
70
Enemies continue fuch in all places
71
Whether women and the children are to be accounted ene mies ibid
72
Of his reprefentative character
73
The difference between the prefent cafe and thofe in the preceding chapter ibid
74
To hinder the departure of thofe that are useful 92
75
Of lands possessed by foreigners in an enemys country ibid
76
Of the Enemies Allies Societies of War Auxiliaries and Subsidies 78 Of treaties relative to war ibid
78
Thlrcdience which fubjects owe to a fovereign
79
Of defenfive and offenfive alliances 392
80
Of auxiliary troops ibid
81
Of fubsidies ibid
82
When a nation is allowed to assist another 393
84
Of alliances made with a nation whilst at war ibid
85
The prince ought to maintain the authority of the judgej ibid
87
What the cafus foederis is ibid
88
Never takes place in an unjust war ibid
89
How it exists in a defensive war ibid
90
And in a treaty of guarantee 395
92
Of fome other cafes and that where two confederates of the fame alliance come to a rupture ibid
93
The cultivation of earth a natural obligation
94
Of anationsrefusing fuccors due in virtue of analliance 396
95
They who make a common caufe are the enemys asso ciates 397
96
And they who assist him without being obliged to it by treaties ibid
97
Or who are in a defenfive alliance with him ibid
98
The imprefcriptibility of thofe founded on treaty
100
In what cafe it does not produce the fame effect ibid
101
Of the Care of the public Ways of communication and the Right
102
And punishable according to the laws 23S 103 Who is the judge of their difputes ibid
103
The protection due to strangers ibid
104
The duties of a stranger 237
106
Strangers continue members of their own nation ibid
107
Of the arts and fciences ibid
108
examples ibid
114
The fovereign ought to have the infpection of the affairs
121
Important employments conferred by a foreign power
128
The clergy drawing every thing to them and disturbing
134
Of distributive justice The distribution of employments and rewards
140
The foundation of the right of punishing the guilty ibid 170 Of the laws against criminals 141
142
Of the right of granting a pardon
145
Of policy ibid 175 Of the duels or private combats ibid 176 The means of putting a stop to this diforder ibid CHAP XIV
146
Of the power of a nation
147
The multiplication of the citizens ibid 180 Of valour
148
Of other military virtues
149
Of the revenues of the state and taxes
150
The advantage of glory ibid 187 How true gry which is the duty of a nation is to be ac quired 151
151
The duty of the prirtce ibid 189 The duty of citizens
152
Attacking the glory of a nation is doing it an injury
153
Voluntary fubmission of one country to another
154
The duty of the members of a slate where the fubjects of a prince are in danger
157
Their right when they are abandoned ibid CHAP XVIII
158
Its right over the parts in its possession
159
The possession of the empire in a vacant country ibid 206 Another manner of possessing the empire of a country ibid 207 How a nation appropriates...
160
Of colonies
161
What is our country ibid 212 Of the citizens and natives
162
Of the inhabitants ibid 214 Naturalization ibid 215 Of the children of citizens born in a foreign country
163
Ofthedomicil ibid 219 Of vagabonds
165
Cafes in which a citizenhas a right toquit the country
166
Of emigrants
167
Of exile and banishment ibid
168
A nation cannot punish faults committed out of its ter ritories
170
The entire wealth of a nation and its divifions ibid 236 Two ways of acquiring public property
171
It may allow him the domain and referve the ufe of it
172
Of the fovereign who has this power ibid 243 The duties of the prince with refpect to taxes
173
Of the eminent domain affixed to fovereignty ibid 245 Of the government with refpect to public property
174
Of the alienation of the goods of a community ibid 248 Of the use of common property
175
The manner in which each ought to enjoy it ibid 250 Of the right of prevention in their use ibid 251 Of the fame right in other cases
176
The duty and right of a fovereign in this refpect ibid 254 Os private property ibid 255 The fovereign may fubmit them to political laws
177
The nation may alienate its public property ibid 258 The duties of a nation in this refpect
178
The nation may give him the right of doing it ibid 262 The rules on this fubject with refpect to treaties between nation and nation
179
Of the alienation of a part of the state ibid 264 The right of those difmembered
180
Of inequality impofed by way of punishment 270
182
Treaties made for the king and his fuccessors 272
189
Several kinds of stibmiuion ibid
194
The right of citizens when the nation fubmits to a for eign power rjL ibid
195
Thefe pacts annulled by the failure of protection 155
197
And by the enterprizes of the protector ibid
198
How the right of the nation protected is lfst by its
199
Of Conventions made by fovereigns 283
207
The right of not fuffering injustice
223
The fovereign ought to revenge the injuries of the state
224
The exile and banished men have a right to live elfe where ibid
229
Of deferts and uncultivated places
230
Of the entering the territory ibid
236
The state has no right over the perfon of a stranger
238
Who are the heirs of a stranger ibid 111 Of the testament of a foreigner
239
Of the right of efcheatage
240
The right of foreign duties
241
Of immoveables possessed by an alien ibid 115 Marriages of aliens ibid CHAP IX
242
Of the right of procuring provifions by force
243
Of the right of carrying off women ibid 123 Of the right of passage
244
And of procuring what we want ibid 125 Of the right of inhabiting a foreign country
245
126 Of things the ufe of which is inexhaustible ibid 127 Of the right of innocent ufe
246
Of the nature of this general right ibid 129 And in cafes not doubtful ibid 130 Of the exercife of this right between nations
247
The general duty of the proprietor ibid 132 Of innocent passage
248
Sureties may be required ibid 134 Of the passage of merchandize ibid 135 Of abode in the country
249
Of the right proceeding from a general permiffion
250
The definition of ufucaption and prefcription
251
They may for their own actions 306
252
What is the obligation of a real alliance when the king
277
That the right of the fuccession ought not to depend on
282
The states not bound by a like agreement
285
Of the private contracts of fovereigns
292
in his engagements ibid
295
It does not change the nature of obligations
298
Of the right founded on custom ibid CHAP XVII
310
it is notTtllowable to interpret what has no need of interpretation
311
what ought to be taken for true which is fusficiently declared
312
the interpretation ought to be made according to certain rules
313
The faith oftreatieslay s an obligation to follow thefe rules ibid 270 General rule of interpretation ibid 271 We ought to explain the terms conformabl...
314
Of the interpretation of ancient treaties
315
Of quibbles on words ibid 274 A rule on this fubject
316
A general remark on the manner of obferving all the pre
322
Of mediation ibid
328
Of conferences and congresses
346
Of what may pafs for a refufal to do justice ibid
350
Of reprifals ibid
352
Just reprifals do not afford a just cause for war
356
BOOK III
358
Of public war ibid 3 Of the right of making war ibid 4 Belongs only to the fovereign power
359
Of War offensive and defensive
360
Of the right of levying troops
361
Whether there are any exemptions from carrying arms
362
Soldiers pay and quarters
363
Of hofpitals for invalids ibid 13 Of mercenary foldiers
364
What mould be obferved in listing fuch
365
Of enlisting in foreign countries ibid 16 Obligation of foldiers
366
Of military laws ibid 18 Of military difcipline ibid 19 Of the fubaltern powers in war
367
How their promifes bind the fovereign ibid 21 In what cafes their promifes bind only themfelves 868
368
lence
369
What is in general a just cause of war ibid 27 What war is unjust
370
Of war whenthe fubject U lawful and the motives faulty
371
Of the pretences
372
Alone and of itfelf it cannot give a right
376
What it is to contain
384
Who is an enemy
390
associates
399
CHAP VII
400
Conduct to be obferved by a neutral nation ibid 105 An ally may furnish the fuccor due from him and remain neuter
401
Of treaties of neutrality 402
402
Esfects of an enemy found in a neutral ship ibid
408
A passage may be refused for a war manifestly unjust
414
A particular cafe excepted
416
Of reprifals
417
Of fugitive deferters
419
Of women children the aged and sick ibid 146 Of the clergy of men of letters c
420
Of peafants and in general of all who donot carry arms ibid 148 Of the right of making prifoners of war
421
A prifoner of war not to be put to death ibid 150 How prifoners of war are to be ufed
422
Whether prifoners of war may be made slaves
424
Of the exchange and ranfom of prifoners ibid 154 The state is obliged to deliver them
425
Whether an enemy is to be assassinated or poifoned ibid 156 Whether poifoned weapons may be ufed in war
428
Whether fprings may be poifoned
429
Difpositions towards an enemy ibid 159 Of regard towards the perfon of a King who is our ene my
430
CHAP IX
431
The right of taking them ibid 162 Of what is taken from the enemy by way of penalty ibid 163 Of detentions for obliging him to give a just fatisfact...
432
Of contributions
433
Of fpoiling ibid 167 Of ravaging and burning ibid 168 What things are to be fpared
435
Of bombarding towns ibid 170 Demolition of fortresses
442
Ofmonopolics and trading companies with exclusive priv
455
Of the balance of trade and the attention of government
464
Rule of the voluntary law of nations on the fame fub ject ibid C H A P X
469
Or to introduce fuccours ibid
476
From what authority it emanes ibid
482
Of a prifoner dying before payment of ranfom
485
Faith to be facred between enemies 437
488
Conduct to be obferved by foreign nations
494
On what occafion they may be broken 439
497
Of conventions relating to the ranfom of prifoners ibid
498
How the sovereign may in a treaty difpofe of what con
500
The nature of this right 169
503
Restitution not to be understood of thofe who have volun
509
Of the penalty annexed to the violation of an article
515
Of ministers
525
Of confuls agents deputies c ibid 76 Of credentials
526
Of instructions ibid 78 Of the right of fending ambassadors ibid 79 Of the honors due to ambassadors
527
CHAP VII
528
Their person facred and inviolable
529
Particular protection due to them ibid 83 Of the time when it commences
530
What is due to them in countries thro which they pafs ibid 85 Abassidors going into an enemys country
532
By and to whom they may be fent
534
Independence of foreign ministers ibid 93 How the foreign minister is to behave
536
How he may be corrected first with regard to common faults
538
2d For faults committed against the prince ibid 96 Right of ordering away an ambassador who is guilty or justly fufpected
539
Rightof checkinghimbyforce ifhebehavesasan enemyibid 98 Of an ambassador forming dangerous plots confpiracies
540
What is allowable against him according to the exigen cies of the cafe
541
Of an ambassador who should attempt the princes life
542
Two remarkable instances concerning the immunities of public ministers
543
Whether reprilals may be ufed towards an ambassador
544
Agreement of nations concerning the privileges of ambas fadors
545
Of the free exercife of religion
546
Whether an ambassador be exempted for all imposts
547
Of the obligation founded on ufe and custom
548
Of a minister whofe character is not public ibid 108 Of a fovereign in a foreign country 54 9
550
CHAP VIII
551
The ambassador is exempt from the civil jurisdiction of the country where he refides
552
Of a minister fubject to the state where he is employed
553
Not to immoveables which he possesses in the country
555
How justice may be obtained against an ambassador
556
CHAP IX
557
Of the right of afylum
559
Of the ambassadors retinue
560
Of the ambassadors confort and family ibid 122 Of the fecretary of the embassy
561
Of the ambassadors couriers and difpatcher ibid l 24 The ambassadors authority over his retinue ibid 125 When the right of ambassadors end
562
Of the cafes when credential letters are necessary
563

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