James Chalmers: His Autobiography and Letters

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The Religious Tract Society, 1902 - Missionaries - 511 pages
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Page 502 - Oh that one would give me drink of the water of the well of Beth-lehem, which is by the gate! And the three mighty men brake through the host of the Philistines, and drew water out of the well of Beth-lehem...
Page 104 - Before we laid ourselves down to sleep, the elder Tahitian fell on his knees, and with closed eyes repeated a long prayer in his native tongue. He prayed as a Christian should do, with fitting reverence, and without the fear of ridicule or any ostentation of piety. At our meals neither of the men would taste food, without saying beforehand a short grace.
Page 463 - Some time after being taken ill, when the Niue returned to us from the Straits, I proposed going to Thursday Island and away to Sydney, but she very decidedly opposed it, and the weather being very bad I did not press it. When again we had the Niue it was too late. During her illness she frequently thanked God for sparing her from day to day, as her light was brighter, her faith stronger, her love greater, and she had good opportunities of much communion with Jesus before she went to His home.' After...
Page 482 - Gebai has got Mr. Chalmers' head at Dopima, and Mahikaha has got Mr. Tomkins' head at Turotere. The rest of the heads are divided amongst various individuals. Anybody having a new head would naturally, on seeing strange people coming to the village, hide them away in the bush, and leave only the old skulls in the houses. The same applies to the loot from the Niue. As regards the skulls in the houses, those having artificial noses attached to them are of people who have died natural deaths ; those...
Page 502 - Hear my wish. It is a great wish. The remainder of my strength I would spend in the place where Tamate and Mr. Tomkins were killed. In that village I would live. In that place where they killed men, Jesus Christ's name and His word I would teach to the people, that they may become Jesus' children. My wish is just this. You know it. I have spoken.
Page 214 - Find me the man — and I will take him as my help — who utterly despises money, name, glory, honour — one who never wishes to see his home again — one who looks to God as the source of good and controller of evil- -one who has a healthy body and energetic spirit, and one who looks on death as a release from misery ; and if you cannot find him, then leave me alone.
Page 276 - I know a few of the groups close on the line, and for at least nine years of my life I have lived with the savages of New Guinea ; but I have never yet met with a single man or woman, or with a single people, that your civilization .without Christianity has civilized.
Page 27 - I felt that this salvation was possible for me, and some gladness came to my heart. After a time light increased, and I felt that God was speaking to me in His Word, and I believed unto salvation.
Page 361 - I had conceived a great prejudice against Missions in the South Seas, and I had no sooner come there than that prejudice was at first reduced, and then at last annihilated. Those who deblatterate against Missions have only one thing to do — to come and see them on the spot.
Page 424 - The presentation ceremony took place in the Inveraray Court-house, and was attended by a considerable number of townspeople, and also by many visitors. The Council minute deciding to admit the Rev. Mr. Chalmers a free burgess and a guild brother in recognition of ' his career as a missionary and his eminent services in the cause of civilization and the spread of the Gospel among the heathen ' was inscribed on parchment, and was presented to Mr.

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