The southern colonies

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Sheldon & Company, 1860 - Indians of North America
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Page 26 - Atlantic navigation, taking possession of the country in the name of the king of Portugal, and finally sailed or was blown around the southern extremity of the continent without being aware of it.
Page 155 - Heaven and earth seemed never to have agreed better to frame a place for man's commodious and delightful habitation.
Page v - IT is the design of this work to narrate, in a clear, simple, and intelligible manner, the leading events connected with the history of our country, from the earliest periods, down, as nearly as practicable, to the present time. The several volumes will be illustrated with all necessary maps and with numerous engravings, and the work is intended to comprise, in a distinct and connected narrative, all that it is essential for the general reader to understand in respect to the subject of it, while...
Page 154 - There were rivulets and brooks gurgling down, and running most pleasantly into a fair bay encompassed on all sides except at the mouth with fruitful and delightsome land. In the bay and rivers were many islands, both great and small, some woody, others plain, but most of them low and uninhabited.
Page v - PREFACE. IT is the design of this work to narrate, in a clear, simple, and intelligible manner, the leading events connected with the history of our country, from the earliest periods, down, as nearly as practicable, to the present time.
Page 205 - And thus, about Michaelmas, one thousand six hundred and nine, Captain Smith left the country, never again to see it. He left behind him, three ships and seven boats; commodities ready for trade; the corn newly gathered; ten weeks...
Page 155 - ... and inhabited by industrious people. Here are mountains, hills, plains, valleys, rivers and brooks all running most pleasantly into a fair Bay compassed but for the mouth with fruitful and delightsome land. In the Bay and rivers are many Isles both great and small, some woody, some plain, most of them low and not inhabited.
Page 248 - Carolina, he makes an unanswerable plea for liberality and religious freedom : " It is stupendous to consider how passionate and preposterous zeal not only vails but stupefies, oftentimes, the rational powers; for cannot Dissenters kill wolves and bears, &c., as well as Churchmen; as also fell trees and clear ground for plantations, and Tie as capable of defending the same, generally, as well as the other?
Page 181 - He had continually about him a body guard of forty or fifty of the tallest men in his dominions, and after the coming of the English to James Town this guard was increased to two hundred.

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