Conscience in Medieval Philosophy

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 18, 2002 - Philosophy - 168 pages
This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, present the loci classici on which subsequent discussions drew; there follows the first complete treatise on conscience, by Philip the Chancellor, while the two remaining translations, from Bonaventure and Aquinas, have been chosen as outstanding examples of the two main approaches which crystallised during the thirteenth century.
 

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Contents

Peter Lombard and Jerome
1
Philip the Chancellor
12
Bonaventure
32
Aquinas
45
Balancesheet
61
Notes on the translations
75
Jerome Commentary on Ezekiel 17
79
Augustine On the Trinity book 12 excerpts
81
Bonaventure Commentary on Peter Lombards Books of Judgements 239
110
Aquinas Debated Questins on Truth 1617
122
Medieval texts on conscience
137
Programme for a medievalphilosophy course on conscience
140
Bibliography
145
Analytical index of subjects
146
Index of proper names
151
Index of Biblical references

Peter Lombard Books of Judgements 239
90
Philip the Chancellor Summa de bono treatise on conscience
94

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