Barron's CDL Commercial Driver's License Truck Driver's Test

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Barron's Educational Series, 2010 - Education - 436 pages
2 Reviews
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You need to read and study this book if you intend to take the CDL. The authors carefully prepare you for the test you must pass in order to receive your Commercial Driver's License. Administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation, the CDL test is required in all 50 states and U.S. territories. This manual gives you detailed coverage of both the written test and the behind-the-wheel test and provides specific answers to all questions, as well as explanations for all situations. Easy-to-follow diagrams and illustrations demonstrate the skills you must master so that you'll be prepared to do well when you take your behind-the-wheel test.
 

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At least, if your going to write a book, have your FACTS STRAIGHT. The only thing a CDL driver cannot do after 14 hours is DRIVE. (PERIOD). NO WHERE IN D.O.T. REGULATIONS DOES IT SAY a driver may not work on duty not driving. It only say driver may not drive a commercial motor vehicle. In other words if I roll into my company yard, or a truck stop for that matter, within minutes before my 14th on duty is expired without having drove more than 11 hours, I can park and go on duty not driving to complete my paperwork in "on duty not driving", status for AS LNG AS I NEED TOO. I can work 24/7 as LONG as I don't DRIVE A COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE BUT I can sweep out my trailer, do a vehicle inspection, ect., as long as I DO NOT DRIVE a CMV BEFORE TAKING 10 CONSECUTIVE HOURS OFF DUTY.
(1) Start of work shift. A driver may not drive without first taking 10 consecutive hours off duty;
(2) 14-hour period. A driver may drive only during a period of 14 consecutive hours after coming on duty following 10 consecutive hours off duty. The driver may not drive after the end of the 14-consecutive-hour period without first taking 10 consecutive hours off duty.
(3) Driving time and rest breaks. (i) Driving time. A driver may drive a total of 11 hours during the 14-hour period specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.
(ii) Rest breaks. Except for drivers who qualify for either of the short-haul exceptions in 395.1(e)(1) or (2), driving is not permitted if more than 8 hours have passed since the end of the driver's last off-duty or sleeper-berth period of at least 30 minutes.
(b) No motor carrier shall permit or require a driver of a property-carrying commercial motor vehicle to drive, nor shall any driver drive a property-carrying commercial motor vehicle, regardless of the number of motor carriers using the driver's services, for any period after—
(1) Having been on duty 60 hours in any period of 7 consecutive days if the employing motor carrier does not operate commercial motor vehicles every day of the week; or
(2) Having been on duty 70 hours in any period of 8 consecutive days if the employing motor carrier operates commercial motor vehicles every day of the week.
(c)(1) Any period of 7 consecutive days may end with the beginning of an off-duty period of 34 or more consecutive hours that includes two periods from 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m.
(2) Any period of 8 consecutive days may end with the beginning of an off-duty period of 34 or more consecutive hours that includes two periods from 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m.
(d) A driver may not take an off-duty period allowed by paragraph (c) of this section to restart the calculation of 60 hours in 7 consecutive days or 70 hours in 8 consecutive days until 168 or more consecutive hours have passed since the beginning of the last such off-duty period. When a driver takes more than one off-duty period of 34 or more consecutive hours within a period of 168 consecutive hours, he or she must indicate in the Remarks section of the record of duty status which such off-duty period is being used to restart the calculation of 60 hours in 7 consecutive days or 70 hours in 8 consecutive days.
Citation: [76 FR 81188, Dec. 27, 2011, as amended at 78 FR 58485, Sept. 24, 2013; 78 FR 64181, Oct. 28, 2013]
Disclaimer:
Although we make every effort to assure that the information we provide is complete and accurate, it is not intended to take the place of published agency regulations. Regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation and its Operating Administrations are published in the Federal Register and compiled in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Copies of appropriate volumes of the CFR in book format may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, or examined at many libraries.
The CFR may also be viewed online at http://ECFR.gpoaccess.gov.
 

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User Review  - natsin - Overstock.com

Even though this text is not state specific it has some valuable info. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
PASS Is Action
10
Be Systematic
18
Types of Test Questions
25
Tips for Different Test Question Types
31
PASS Posttrip
53
Safety Control Systems
105
Troubleshooting
125
The Brake System
223
Operational Control Valves
229
Air Brake System Inspection
235
Driving with Air Brakes
242
Coupling a Single Semitrailer
248
Uncoupling Doubles
254
Pulling Trailers Safely
261
Tank Vehicle Endorsement
271

Emergencies
143
Visual Alertness
152
Space Management
159
Driving in Winter
165
Emergency Maneuvers
173
Loading Securing and Hauling
181
Loading Cargo
187
Driving with a Load
193
Vehicle Inspection
199
Why Inspect
200
State and Local Requirements
207
PASS Posttrip
215
Emergency Systems
277
Review
337
Sample Test 2351
351
CDL Skills Tests
377
Coupling and Uncoupling
384
Safe Driving Skills Test
393
Final Tips for the Test
401
Appendix
409
Appendix
419
Index
431
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