The Republic of Plato, Volume 2

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Macmillan and Company, 1908 - 370 pages
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Page 373 - The Christian Year. Thoughts in Verse for the Sundays and Holy Days throughout the Year.
Page 371 - THE FAIRY BOOK ; the Best Popular Fairy Stories. Selected and rendered anew by the Author of
Page 374 - The Trial and Death of Socrates. Being the Euthyphron, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo of Plato.
Page 203 - I should have no objection to define reason with Jacobi and with his friend Hemsterhuis, as an organ bearing the same relation to spiritual objects, the universal, the eternal, and the necessary, as the eye bears to material and contingent phenomena. But then it must be added, that it is an organ identical with its appropriate objects. Thus, God, the soul, eternal truth, &c., are the objects of reason; but they are themselves reason. We name God the Supreme Reason; and Milton says, — — whence...
Page 371 - The Golden Treasury of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Selected and arranged, with Notes, by FRANCIS TURNER PALGRAVE.
Page 371 - THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF THE BEST SONGS AND LYRICAL POEMS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Selected and arranged, with Notes, by FRANCIS TURNER PALGRAVE.
Page 169 - ... forming one kingdom under the ruling power therein, feels the hurt and sympathizes all together with the part affected, and we say that the man has a pain in his finger; and the same expression is used about any other part of the body, which has a sensation of pain at suffering or of pleasure at the alleviation of suffering.
Page 194 - I dare say you will remember, who listened to sweet sounds [480] and gazed upon fair colours, but would not tolerate the existence of absolute beauty. Yes, I remember. Shall we then be guilty of any impropriety in calling them lovers of opinion rather than lovers of wisdom, and will they be very angry with us for thus describing them?
Page 67 - ... which are to be found in Homer, must be refused admittance into our state, whether they be allegorical or not. For a child cannot discriminate between what is allegory and what is not ; and whatever at that age is adopted as a matter of belief, has a tendency to become fixed and indelible , and therefore, perhaps, we ought to esteem it of the greatest importance that the fictions which children first hear should be adapted in the most perfect manner to the promotion of virtue.
Page 374 - Guesses at Truth. By Two BROTHERS. New Edition. The Cavalier and his Lady. Selections from the Works of the First Duke and Duchess of Newcastle. With an Introductory Essay by EDWARD JENKINS, Author of " Ginx's Baby,

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