Understanding Minimalist Syntax: Lessons from Locality in Long-Distance Dependencies

Front Cover
Wiley, Jul 16, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 192 pages
Understanding Minimalist Syntax introduces the logic of the Minimalist Program by analyzing well-known descriptive generalizations about long-distance dependencies.

  • An introduction to the logic of the minimalist program - arguably the most important branch of syntax
  • Proposes a new theory of how long-distance dependencies are formed, with implications for theories of locality, and the minimalist program as a whole
  • Introduces the logic of the minimalist program by analyzing well-known descriptive generalizations about long-distance dependencies, and asks why they should be true of natural languages
  • Rich in empirical coverage, which will be welcomed by experts in the field, yet accessible enough for students looking for an introduction to the minimalist program.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

References to this book

About the author (2007)

Cedric Boeckx is Assistant Professor of Linguistics and a member of the Mind/Brain/Behavior Interfaculty Initiative at Harvard University. He is the author of Islands and Chains (2003), Linguistic Minimalism (2006), and numerous articles in journals such as Linguistic Inquiry and Natural Language and Linguistic Theory.

Bibliographic information