The Grammar of Science

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A. and C. Black, 1900 - Classification of sciences - 548 pages
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Contents

Attitude of Science towards Ejects
51
The Scientif1c Validity of a Conception V
55
The Canons of Legitimate Inference
59
Materials of Knowapplied to Unthinkable
60
CHAPTER III
75
THE SCIENTIFIC LAW 1 AAt and Foreword 2 Of the Word Law and its Meanings
79
Natural Law relative to
82
Man as the Maker of Natural
85
The Two Senses of the Words Natural Law 6 Confusion between the Two Senses of Natural
88
The Reason behind Nature
90
S True Relation of Civil and Natural
93
Physical and Metaphysical Supersensuousness
95
Progress in the Formulating of Natural
96
The Universality of Scientific Law 12 The Routine of Perceptions possibly a Product of the Perceptiv Faculty
100
The Mind as a SortingMachine
106
Science Natural Theology and Metaphysics
107
Conclusions Summary and Literature 77 79 S S7 88 90 93 95 96 101 106 107
109
CHAPTER IV
113
Force as a Cause
116
Will as a Cause
118
Secondary Causes involve no Enforcement
120
Is Will a First Cause?
122
Will as a Secondary Cause
123
First Causes have no Existence for Science
127
The Universe of SenseImpressions as a Universe of Motions
132
CHAPTER V
152
The Infinite Divisibility of Space 150
159
Sameness and Continuity
167
Conceptual Discontinuity of Bodies The Atom 10 Conceptual Continuity Ether 174
174
Time as a Mode of Perception
181
Concluding Remarks on Space and Time
190
Rigid Bodies as Geometrical Ideals
198
Factors of Conceptual Motion
205
The TimeChart
212
The Velocity Diagram or Hodograph Acceleration
219
Acceleration as a Spurt and a Shunt
222
Curvature
224
is The Relation between Curvature and Normal Acceleration
228
Fundamental Propositions in the Geometry of Motion
231

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Page 340 - Newton, Law I.—Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by force to change that state. Now the
Page 34 - Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work ; but I was so anxious to avoid prejudice, that I determined not for some time to write even the briefest sketch of it. In June 1842
Page 317 - its intellect were vast enough to submit these data to analysis, would include in one and the same formula the movements of the largest bodies in the universe and those of the lightest atom. Nothing would be uncertain for it, the future as well as the past would be present to its eyes.
Page 90 - A law, in the most general and comprehensive acceptation in which the term, in its literal meaning, is employed, may be said to be a rule laid down for the guidance of an intelligent being by an intelligent being having power over him.
Page 33 - By collecting all facts which bore in any way on the variation of animals and plants under domestication and nature, some light might perhaps be thrown on the whole subject. My first note-book was opened in July 1837. I worked on true Baconian principles,
Page 100 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure of working, the same we term a Law
Page 317 - in the perfection it has been able to give to astronomy, affords a feeble outline of such an intelligence. Its discoveries in mechanics and in geometry, joined to that of universal gravitation, have brought it within reach of comprehending in the same analytical expressions the past and future states of the systems of the world.
Page 34 - I first allowed myself the satisfaction of writing a very brief abstract of my theory in pencil in 35 pages ; and this was enlarged during the summer of 1844 into one of 230 pages, which I had fairly copied out and still possess.
Page 5 - sum up the aim and method of modern science. The scientific man has above all things to strive at self-elimination in his judgments, to provide an argument which is as true for each individual mind as for his own. The classification of facts, the recognition of their sequence and relative Significance is
Page 98 - sense-impressions. Law in the scientific sense is thus essentially a product of the human mind and has no meaning apart from man. It owes its existence to the creative power of his intellect. There is more meaning in the statement that man gives laws to Nature than in its converse that Nature gives laws to man. 5.—

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