The Forgetting Room: A Fiction

Front Cover
Collins Publishers, 1997 - Fiction - 105 pages
22 Reviews
Readers are invited to delve into the journal of Armon Hurt, a sad, discontented man who discovers his inner fire. When his artist grandfather dies, leaving him the family home in Spain, Armon travels to Andalusia with the intention of selling the property. Once there, however, he finds a sealed cardboard case containing a small oil painting and a surreal booklet.

As he examines these mysterious artifacts, Armon realizes that he is holding both his grandfather's last communication to him and a puzzle. He begins to decipher the conundrum, and as each new answer leads to more questions, Armon finds himself painting furiously in his grandfather's old studio -- strangely compelled to create a picture that is somehow linked to his legacy.

Featuring paintings, drawings, collages, and paper foldouts, this is no ordinary novel. The Forgetting Room is a handmade treasure, a seamless blend of artistry and language, and a tantalizing read.

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Review: The Forgetting Room: A Fiction

User Review  - Pat Kane - Goodreads

I am conflicted about this book. I did love the premise itself. The main character has received an inheritance from his grandfather, a home in Spain. His grandfather seems to have been a stronger ... Read full review

Review: The Forgetting Room: A Fiction

User Review  - AJ Best - Goodreads

A sweet tale of finding ones own true self and realizing that you can be more than you know. As in true Bantock form there was plenty of intrigue and artistic wonder to fill your soul. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
15
Section 2
40
Section 3
41
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (1997)

Nick Bantock was born in Stourbridge, England on the 14th of July 1949. He went to school in the suburbs of North East London, and from there moved on to an art college in the market town of Maidstone, Kent. At the age of 23, he quit his job in a gambling house and began working as a freelance illustrator. In 16 years he produced approximately 300 book covers, including novels by Philip Roth and John Updike. During the winter of 1988 he moved to Vancouver Canada, and two years later started work on his own books. He is most well known for his Griffin and Sabine Trilogy, an artful representation of a long distance romance. His other works include The Artful Dodger: Images and Reflections (2000) - a visual autobiography, and retrospective, Urgent 2nd Class: Creating Curious Collage, Dubious Documents, and Other Art from Ephemera (2004) and Windflower (2006) - with Edoardo Ponti.

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