The Associations of Classical Athens: The Response to Democracy

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Oxford University Press, Feb 4, 1999 - History - 368 pages
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Jones' book examines the associations of ancient Athens under the classical democracy (508/7-321 B.C.) in light of their relations to the central government. Associations of all types--village communities, cultic groups, brotherhoods, sacerdotal families, philosophical schools, and others--emerge as fundamentally similar instances of Aristotelian koinoniai. Each, it is argued, acquired its distinctive character in response to particular features of the contemporary democracy. The analysis results in the first integrated, holistic institutional reconstruction of Greece's first city.
 

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Contents

1 Associations Solons Law and the Democracy
25
Definitions and Membership
51
3 The Isolation of the Demes
82
Expansion and Decline
123
Disposition Meetings and Solidarity
151
Instruments of Representation?
174
7 The Phratries
195
8 Clubs Schools Regional and Cultic Associations
221
The Response to Democracy
288
Appendix 1 PostMacedonian Associations at Athens
307
Appendix 2 Solons Law on Associations
311
Appendix 3 Documents of the Internally Organized Phylai
321
Bibliography
325
Select Literary Passages
333
Select Inscriptions
335
Subject Index
337

9 The Organization of the Cretan City in Platos Laws
268

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Page 23 - Forbes, Neoi. A contribution to the study of Greek associations, Middletown Conn.
Page 26 - The clubs here discussed may be defined as voluntary associations of persons more or less permanently organized for the pursuit of a common end, and so distinguishable both from the State and its component elements on the one hand, and on the other from temporary unions for transitory purposes.
Page xv - LSJ HG Liddell and R. Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon (9th edition revised by HS Jones, Oxford 1940...
Page 9 - The answer, may I suggest, is to be found in the widely acknowledged exemplary role played by the central government with respect to its segmental units. As the polis went, so went the phratry, deme, phyle, and the rest.

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