Blood and Iron (American Empire, Book One)

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Jul 25, 2006 - Fiction - 630 pages
23 Reviews
AMERICAN EMPIRE: BOOK ONE

Twice in the last century, brutal war erupted between the United States and the Confederacy. Then, after a generation of relative peace, The Great War exploded worldwide. As the conflict engulfed Europe, the C.S.A. backed the Allies, while the U.S. found its own ally in Imperial Germany. The Confederate States, France, and England all fell. Russia self-destructed, and the Japanese, seeing that the cause was lost, retired to fight another day.

The Great War has ended, and an uneasy peace reigns around most of the world. But nowhere is the peace more fragile than on the continent of North America, where bitter enemies share a single landmass and two long, bloody borders.

In the North, proud Canadian nationalists try to resist the colonial power of the United States. In the South, the once-mighty Confederate States have been pounded into poverty and merciless inflation. U.S. President Teddy Roosevelt refuses to return to pre-war borders. The scars of the past will not soon be healed. The time is right for madmen, demagogues, and terrorists.

At this crucial moment in history, with Socialists rising to power in the U.S. under the leadership of presidential candidate Upton Sinclair, a dangerous fanatic is on the rise in the Confederacy, preaching a message of hate. And in Canada another man--a simple farmer--has a nefarious plan: to assassinate the greatest U.S. war hero, General George Armstrong Custer.

With tension on the seas high, and an army of Marxist Negroes lurking in the swamplands of the Deep South, more than enough people are eager to return the world to war. Harry Turtledove sends his sprawling cast of men and women--wielding their own faiths, persuasions, and private demons--into the troubled times between the wars.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

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Review: Blood & Iron (American Empire #1)

User Review  - Kristopher - Goodreads

Very well written, I liked the continued character development from the Great War Trilogy. Very relatable to Nazi Germany, for those who like that kind of thing. Read full review

Review: Blood & Iron (American Empire #1)

User Review  - Michael Thompson - Goodreads

This series by Turtledove takes place between the first and second world wars. As a result, there's really no military action (which makes this series considerably duller than the Great War series and ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
38
Section 4
69
Section 5
100
Section 6
131
Section 7
162
Section 8
193
Section 21
600
Section 22
631
Section 23
632
Section 24
633
Section 25
634
Section 26
635
Section 27
636
Section 28
637

Section 9
224
Section 10
255
Section 11
286
Section 12
318
Section 13
349
Section 14
380
Section 15
412
Section 16
444
Section 17
476
Section 18
508
Section 19
539
Section 20
570
Section 29
638
Section 30
639
Section 31
640
Section 32
641
Section 33
642
Section 34
643
Section 35
644
Section 36
645
Section 37
646
Section 38
647
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Harry Turtledove is the award-winning author of the alternate-history works The Man with the Iron Heart, The Guns of the South, and How Few Remain (winner of the Sidewise Award for Best Novel); the War That Came Early novels: Hitler’s War, West and East, The Big Switch, Coup d’Etat, and Two Fronts; the Worldwar saga: In the Balance, Tilting the Balance, Upsetting the Balance, and Striking the Balance;the Colonization books: Second Contact, Down to Earth, and Aftershocks; the Great War epics: American Front, Walk in Hell, and Breakthroughs; the American Empire novels: Blood & Iron, The Center Cannot Hold, and Victorious Opposition; and the Settling Accounts series: Return Engagement, Drive to the East, The Grapple, andIn at the Death. Turtledove is married to fellow novelist Laura Frankos. They have three daughters: Alison, Rachel, and Rebecca.

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