Patterns In The Mind: Language And Human Nature

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Basic Books, Aug 4, 2008 - Psychology - 256 pages
2 Reviews
What is it about the human mind that accounts for the fact that we can speak and understand a language? Why can't other creatures do the same? And what does this tell us about the rest of human abilities? Recent dramatic discoveries in linguistics and psychology provide intriguing answers to these age-old mysteries. In this fascinating book, Ray Jackendoff emphasizes the grammatical commonalities across languages, both spoken and signed, and discusses the implications for our understanding of language acquisition and loss.
 

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PATTERNS IN THE MIND: Language and Human Nature

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

In a challenging, timely, and persuasive argument, Jackendoff (Brandeis; the scholarly Semantics and Cognition, 1983—not reviewed) proposes that language and, by extension, music and visual ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - krisiti - LibraryThing

Good introduction to the universal grammar theory. I do need to go back to Chomsky some time. And very convincing. I was especially surprised by how easy it apparently is to construct a new language ... Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
8
IV
21
V
39
VI
53
VII
66
VIII
83
IX
101
XI
126
XII
141
XIII
159
XIV
165
XV
184
XVI
204
XVII
223
XVIII
241

X
112

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About the author (2008)

Ray Jackendoff, linguist and theoretical psychologist, is professor of linguistics at Brandeis University. He is the author of several books, including Semantic Interpretation in Generative Grammar, Semantics and Cognition, Consciousness and the Computational Mind, and Semantic Structures.

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