The Historical Library of Diodorus the Sicilian: In Fifteen Books. To which are Added the Fragments of Diodorus, and Those Published by H. Valesius, I. Rhodomannus, and F. Ursinus, Volume 2

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Page 265 - Sulpitius and Quintus Aulius were created Roman consuls, Aridaeus, to whom was committed the care of conveying Alexander's body to his sepulchre, having now the chariot ready upon which it was to be carried, prepared himself for the journey. But, forasmuch as the whole business and concern was managed as became the majesty of Alexander, and upon that account did not only exceed all others in point of expense, state, and pomp, (for the charges amounted to many talents), but also in respect of curiosity...
Page 203 - ... another with drawn swords, and many who were conceived to have got a greater share than the rest, were killed in the quarrel. Some things that were of extraordinary value they divided with their swords, and each took a share. Others, in rage, cut off the hands of such as laid hold of a thing that was in dispute. ' They first ravished the women as they were in their jewels and rich attire, and then sold them for slaves. So that, by how much Persepolis excelled all the other cities in glory and...
Page 1 - Mago, their general, and one of the suffetes, lost a great battle, in which he was slain. The Carthaginian chiefs demanded a peace, which was granted on condition of their evacuating all Sicily, and defraying the expenses of the war. They pretended to accept the terms ; but representing that it was not in their power to deliver up the cities, without first obtaining an order from their republic, they obtained so long a truce, as gave them time sufficient for sending to Carthage.
Page 112 - Mjsia, oyer against 1 .r>di".. him, and possessing himself of his seal-ring, he wrote letters in his name, to the several cities, signifying that through the means of Mentor he had heen restored to the king's favour: and he sent away, likewise, with those that carried the letters, such as he had ordered to take possession, in the name of the king, of all the forts and castles. The governors of the cities, giving credit to the letters, and being, likewise, very desirous of peace, delivered up all...
Page 205 - The king, stirred up at these words, embraced the motion; upon which, as many as were present left their cups and leaped upon the table, and said — That they would now celebrate a victorious festival to Bacchus. Hereupon, multitudes of fire-brands were presently got together, and all the women that played on musical instruments, which were at the feast, were called for, and then the king, with songs, pipes, and flutes, bravely led the way to this noble expedition, contrived and managed by this...
Page 121 - ... due punishment for their wickedness. The most famous cities that shared with them in the impiety were subdued by Antipater, and deprived of their liberty. Nor did the wives of the robbers escape; for adorned with the plundered jewels of the temple, they met with awful fates which Diodorus relates. On the contrary, Philip, who appeared in defence of the oracle, ever prospering from that time for his piety, was at last declared supreme governor of all Greece, and gained the largest kingdom in Europe...
Page 404 - ... more (who were liable to censure) voluntarily offered themselves up: for among the Carthaginians there was a brazen statue of Saturn putting forth the palms of his hands bending in such a manner towards the earth, as that the boy who was laid upon them, in order to be sacrificed, should slip off, and so fall down headlong into a deep fiery furnace.
Page 105 - Sidonians, by which the whole city and inhabitants were consumed to ashes, the king sold the rubbish, and relicts of the fire for many talents : for, the city being very rich, there was found a vast quantity of gold and silver melted down by the flames. Thus sad was the calamity under which the Sidonians suffered. The rest of the cities, being terrified with this destruction, ' presently surrendered themselves to the Persians. A little before this Artemisia, the princess of Caria, died, having governed...
Page 401 - ... of breeding mares. And what shall I say more? Those places abounded with plenty of all things for the use of man, and the rather so, because they were the possessions of the nobility of Carthage, who laid out much of their estates and wealth with more than ordinary curiosity to improve them for their delight and pleasure; so that the fertility and sweetness of the country was the admiration of the Sicilians, and rouzed up their drooping spirits in the view they had of those rewards and rich returns,...
Page 204 - Here (at Persepolis) Alexander made a sumptuous feast for the entertainment of his friends in commemoration of his victory, and offered magnificent sacrifices to the gods. At this feast were entertained women who prostituted their bodies for hire, where the cups went so high, aud the reins so let loose to drunkenness and debauchery, that many were both drunk and mad.

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