Our Inner Conflicts: A Constructive Theory of Neurosis

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1992 - Psychology - 250 pages
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Here Karen Horney develops a dynamic theory of neurosis centered on the basic conflict among attitudes of "moving forward" "moving against," and "moving away from" people. Unlike Freud, Horney does not regard neurosis as rooted in instinct. In her words, her theory is contructive because "it allows us for the first time to tackle and resolve neaurotic hopelessness. . . . Neurotic conflicts cannot be resolved by rational decision. . . . But [they] can be resolved by changing the conditions within the personality that brought them into being."
 

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Contents

THE POIGNANCY OF NEUROTIC CONFLICTS
21
THE BASIC CONFLICT
32
MOVING TOWARD PEOPLE
46
MOVING AGAINST PEOPLE
61
MOVING AWAY FROM PEOPLE
71
THE IDEALIZED IMAGE
94
EXTERNALIZATION
113
AUXILIARY APPROACHES TO ARTIFICIAL HARMONY
129
FEARS
141
IMPOVERISHMENT OF PERSONALITY
152
HOPELESSNESS
177
SADISTIC TRENDS
189
RESOLUTION OF NEUROTIC CONFLICTS
215
INDEX
243
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About the author (1992)

Karen Horney (1885-1952) was one of the most influential psychoanalysts of the twentieth century. Her books include Neurosis and Human Growth, The Neurotic Personality of Our Time, New Ways in Psychoanalysis, Our Inner Conflicts, Self-Analysis, Feminine Psychology, Final Lectures, and, as editor, Are You Considering Psychoanalysis?

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