The Straight Dope: A Compendium of Human Knowledge

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Ballantine Books, 1984 - Humor - 417 pages
26 Reviews
For the past twenty-five years, in his books and weekly newspaper column, world-history genius Cecil Adams has been patiently explaining to the Teeming Millions how the world works. He answered questions such as how do porcupines mate, what exactly does Barney Rubble do for a living, and where is Einstein's brain? His answers changed your life. Or at least settled a bet with a loved one. But surely, you are thinking, all the salient facts of the universe have been ascertained by now. Ha! Get a load of the mysteries The Master explores in this landmark volume: If Teflon is such a nonsticky substance, how do they get it to stick to the pan? Is the Great Cabal implanting microchips in our brains? Do fluorescent lights cause cataracts? What do Scotsmen wear under those kilts? Can some people extinguish street lamps by force of their bodily emanations? Is the U.S. government really hiding alien spaceships?

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Review: The Straight Dope (The Straight Dope)

User Review  - Goodreads

This is one of the most hysterically funny books you can buy! Cecil used to write a column and compiled questions and answers into this (and, I believe, other) book. Cecil is such a wit. I purchased ... Read full review

Review: The Straight Dope (The Straight Dope)

User Review  - T. - Goodreads

This is one of the most hysterically funny books you can buy! Cecil used to write a column and compiled questions and answers into this (and, I believe, other) book. Cecil is such a wit. I purchased ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1
1
Urban Studies
14
The Divine the Mystical and the Just Plain Weird
33
Copyright

19 other sections not shown

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About the author (1984)

Adams, one of the world's legendary recluses, has never been photographed or interviewed. In fact, only a handful of people have ever met him, giving rise to his reputation as the Howard Hughes of American journalism.

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