A Short History of the English People, Volume 2

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G. Newnes, 1908 - Great Britain
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Page 884 - ... whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit ; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect ; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention; or a shop for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Page 650 - Kingston, had I but served God as diligently as I have served the King, he would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 512 - England, and the crown, with all the members and appurtenances, as that I am descended by right line of blood, coming from the good lord King Henry III, and through that right that God, of his grace, hath sent me with help of my kin and of my friends to recover it; the which realm was in point to be undone for default of governance and undoing of good laws.
Page 882 - ... emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end.
Page 484 - By what right are they whom we call lords greater folk than we ? On what grounds have they deserved it ? Why do they hold us in serfage ? If we all came of the same father and mother, of Adam and Eve, how can they say or prove that they are better than we, if it be not that they make us gain for them by our toil what they spend in their pride ? They are clothed in velvet and warm in their furs and their ermines, while wo are covered with rags.
Page 801 - But is there no quick recreation granted? King. Ay, that there is : our court, you know, is haunted With a refined traveller of Spain; A man in all the world's new fashion planted, That hath a mint of phrases in his brain : One, whom the music of his own vain tongue Doth ravish, like enchanting harmony...
Page 484 - Eve, how can they say or prove that they are better than we, if it be not that they make us gain for them by our toil what they spend in their pride ? They are clothed in velvet and warm in their furs and their ermines, while we are covered with rags. They have wine and spices and fair STORING TREASURE IN A VAULT, AD 1338 — 1344.
Page 699 - Wherefore, gracious king, remember yourself, have pity upon your soul ; and think that the day is even at hand, when you shall give account of your office, and of the blood that hath been shed with your sword.
Page 643 - My father was a yeoman and had no lands of his own, only he had a farm of three or four pound by year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep; and my mother milked thirty kine.
Page 868 - I charge thee by the love of our youth, and by my soul's rest, that thou wilt see this man paid ; for if he and his wife had not succored me, I had died in the streets.

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