The Life of Sir Edward Coke: Lord Chief Justice of England in the Reign of James I., with Memoirs of His Contemporaries, Volume 1

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Page 187 - My lord, out of the love I bear to some of your friends, I have a care of your preservation. Therefore I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this parliament. For God and man hath concurred to punish the wickedness of this time.
Page 220 - ... stand at a stay. And surely I may not endure in public place to be wronged without repelling the same to my best advantage to right myself. You are great, and therefore have the more enviers, which would be glad to have you paid at another's cost. Since the time I missed the Solicitor's place, the rather I think by your means, I cannot expect that you and I shall ever serve as Attorney and Solicitor together; but either to serve with another upon your remove, or to step into some other course...
Page 220 - You are great, and therefore have the more enviers, which would be glad to have you paid at another's cost. Since the time I missed the Solicitor's place, the rather I think by your means, I cannot expect that you and I shall ever serve as Attorney and Solicitor together; but either to serve with another upon your remove, or to step into some other course; so as I am more free than ever I was from any occasion of unworthy conforming myself to you, more than general good manners or your particular...
Page 137 - And that she did acknowledge you had a great wit, and an excellent gift of speech, and much other good learning. But in law she rather thought you could make show to the uttermost of your knowledge, than that you were deep.
Page 270 - Ruthven snatching the dagger from the girdle of the man in armour, and holding it to the King's breast, " Remember," said he, " how " unjustly my father suffered by your command; you " are now my prisoner ; submit to my disposal " without resistance or outcry; or this dagger shall
Page 152 - ... and other such strange light terms he gave me, with that insulting which cannot be expressed. " Herewith stirred, yet I said no more but this : ' Mr Attorney, do not depress me so far ; for I have been your better, and may be again, when it please the Queen.
Page 204 - Now for my intention, let me tell you, that if I had thought there had been the least sin in the Plot, I would not have been of it for all the world; and no other cause drew me to hazard my fortune and life, but zeal to God's religion.
Page 332 - I conceive and wish, it is very material, as these times are, that your majesty have some care, that the recorder succeeding be a temperate and discreet man, and assured to your majesty's service. If your majesty, without too much harshness, can continue the place within your own servants, it is best : if not, the man, upon whom the choice is...
Page 105 - ... my estate is nothing correspondent for the maintenance of this dignity; for my father, dying, left me a younger brother, and nothing to me but my bare annuity. Then, growing to man's estate, and some small practice of the law, I took a wife, by whom I have had many children, the keeping of us all being a great impoverishment to my estate, and the daily living of us all nothing but my daily industry.
Page 34 - Hobbs told me that the cause of his Lordship's death was trying an Experiment; viz. as he was taking the aire in a Coach with Dr. Witherborne (a Scotchman, Physician to the King) towards High-gate, snow lay on the ground, and it came into my Lord's thoughts, why flesh might not be preserved in snow, as in Salt. They were resolved they would try the Experiment presently. They alighted out of the Coach and went into a...

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