The Tenement House Problem: Including the Report of the New York State Tenement House Commission of 1900, Volume 1

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Robert Weeks De Forest, Lawrence Veiller
Macmillan, 1903 - Building laws
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Page 92 - A tenement-house within the meaning of this title shall be taken to mean and include any house or building, or portion thereof, which is rented, leased, let or hired out, to be occupied, or is occupied as the home or residence of three families or more living independently of each other, and doing their cooking upon the premises, or by more than two families upon any floor, so living and cooking, but having a common right in the halls, stairways, yards, water-closets or privies, or some of them.
Page 157 - A tenement house within the meaning of this article shall be taken to mean and include every house, building or portion thereof which is rented, leased, let or hired out to be occupied or is occupied as the...
Page 35 - tenement house," when used in this chapter, means any house or building, or portion thereof, which is either rented, leased, let or hired out, to be occupied, or is occupied in whole or in part as the home or residence of three families or more living independently of each other, and doing their cooking upon the premises, and [having a common right in the halls, stairways, yards, water closets or privies, or some of them...
Page 8 - There is hardly a tenement house in which there has not been at least -eae-casa of pulmonary tuberculosis within the last five years, and in some houses there have been as great a number as twenty-two different cases of this terrible disease. From the tenements there comes a stream of sick, helpless people to our hospitals and dispensaries, few of whom are able to afford the luxury of a private physician, and some houses are in such bad sanitary condition that few people can be seriously ill in them...
Page 136 - Every building shall have, with reference to its height, condition, construction, surroundings, character of occupation and number of occupants, reasonable means of egress in case of fire, satisfactory to the commissioner...
Page 8 - They are centers of disease, poverty, vice and crime, where it is a marvel, not that some children grow up to be thieves, drunkards and prostitutes, but that so many should ever grow up to be decent and self-respecting.
Page 160 - ... shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment for not less than three months nor more than two years.
Page 158 - SECTION 1. The Select and Common Councils of the City of Philadelphia...
Page 15 - No one continuous building hereafter constructed, shall be built or converted to the purposes of a tenement or lodging-house in The City of New York, upon an ordinary city lot, and no existing tenement or lodging-house shall be enlarged or altered, or its lot be diminished, so that it shall occupy more than sixty-five per centum of the area of said lot, but where the light and ventilation of such...
Page 90 - The high brick blocks and closely -packed houses where the mobs originated seemed to be literally hives of sickness and vice. It was wonderful to see, and difficult to believe, that so much misery, disease, and wretchedness can be huddled together and hidden by high walls, unvisited and unthought of, so near our own abodes.

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