China opened; or, A display of the topography, history ... etc. of the Chinese empire, revised by A. Reed

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 299 - Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, and changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.
Page 47 - ... it undergoes a kind of fermentation, and the epidermis is easily scraped off. The bark soon dries into the quilled shape in which it is brought to market.
Page 57 - of many cities are much larger than the cities themselves, and it is by no means extraordinary to see an immense walled space without any houses, where formerly a city stood. Villages and hamlets have a beautiful appearance at a distance ; but on entering them, one sees nothing but a heap of houses irregularly thrown together, the outside fair to behold, but the inside without furniture or comforts, and more filthy even than a stable. This does not apply to one district only, but it is common to...
Page 366 - His late majesty, who has now gone the great journey, governed all under heaven's canopy twenty-five years, exercising the utmost caution and industry. Nor evening nor morning was he ever idle. He assiduously aimed at the best possible rule, and hence his government was excellent and illustrious ; the court and the country felt the deepest reverence, and the stillness of profound awe.
Page 88 - Pe-tun-tsze, and Kaou-lin ; the latter of a whitish, the former of a greenish cast. They are pulverized in a mortar, and the substance refined and made into paste. It is then kneaded, rolled, and wrought into a solid substance, to make the ware close and compact. The potter either moulds or forms with a wheel, and afterwards finishes with a chisel. When dried, the ware are painted with a white mineral oil, which adds to their transparency and beauty.
Page 276 - Bootan ; the principal of the red class in Tibet lives at Sakia. These poor mortals pretend to be the incarnation of other Budhus, the names of whom they have kept in mind, though they have never been able to prove the existence of their grandsires, whose mortal state of being they themselves personify. The religious monasteries are all adorned at each angle with the head of a lion, having bells hanging from its lower jaws ; the same ornament is equally conspicuous at every projection of the palaces....
Page 135 - We must now extend our description so as to include the suburbs ; — the streets and buildings of which differ very little, if at all, from those within the walls. On the west they spread out nearly in the form of an isosceles right-angled triangle, opening to the northwest, having the river on the south, and the western wall of the city, for its two equal sides. On the south they occupy the whole space between the wall and the river. On the east they are much less extensive than on the west. There...
Page 57 - ... extremely filthy, and planted with mere hovels. The suburbs 'of many cities are much larger than the cities themselves, and it is by no means extraordinary to see an immense walled space without any houses, where formerly a city stood. Villages and hamlets have a beautiful appearance at a distance ; but...
Page 49 - In the northern provinces, and Leaou-tung, the vine thrives, the grapes are excellent, but the Chinese never attempt to make wine; as raisins, they form an article of exportation.
Page 172 - The Iron Mountain and the Ornamented Mountain are seen from a great distance. On the latter is found a lake which neither rises nor falls.

Bibliographic information