The Garden as an Art

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jul 1, 1993 - Gardening - 233 pages
In this book Miller challenges contemporary aesthetic theory to include gardens in an expanded definition of art. She provides a radical critique of three central tenets within current intellectual debate: first, the art historical notion that art should only be studied within the context of a single culture and period; second, the philosophical belief that art should be conceived as a discrete object unrelated to our survival as persons, as cultural communities, as a species; and third, the notion that all signifying systems are like language.
 

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Contents

Definitions Examples and Paradigms
3
The General Unifying Principles Underlying
25
Additional Aspects of Spatiality
53
Gardens and Current Theories of Art
69
Preference for Distance and Disinterest
93
Environmental Aesthetics and the Effects of Art
107
The Signifying Garden Gardens as Art
121
Great Art Significant Human Content
135
Ideas in Art and Language
147
The Signifying Garden Gardens and Language
153
Gardens as Great Art The Presentation
171
Conclusions
177
Bibliography
201
Index to Gardens
213
Subject Index
219
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Mara Miller is a philosopher and art historian who writes on gardens and environmental aesthetics, Japanese and East Asian aesthetics and art history, and women and gender issues. She has lectured in China, England, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, Japan, and New Zealand, and her work has been published in Polish, Chinese, and Finnish. Also an artist, she has exhibited in Philadelphia and New York City, and her work is in collections throughout the United States.

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