Soviet State and Society Between Revolutions, 1918-1929

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 20, 1992 - History - 284 pages
This is the first book to analyze the relationship between the Soviet state and society from the October Revolution of 1917 to the revolution under Stalin of the late 1920s and early 1930s. Professor Lewis Siegelbaum explores the evolution of the ruling Communist Party and its New Economic Policy and the changing fortunes of industrial workers, peasants, and the scientific and cultural intelligentsia. He demonstrates how these different actors sought to appropriate the promise of the 1917 Revolution for their own purposes, highlights the compromises they made, and explains why in the late 1920s these compromises started to break down.
 

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Contents

Bequeathals of the revolution 19181920
6
The dictatorship of the proletariat theorization and realization
8
The ruling proletariat
25
The awkward peasants
38
The intelligentsia and significant others
50
deconstructing War Communism
63
The crisis of 19201921
67
Conclusion
83
Living with NEP
135
Agrarian debates
137
the gendering of class and the classing of gender
149
Religion antireligion and double faith
156
Industrialization debates
165
Making workers productive
180
Dangers and opportunities
188
The countryside in crisis
190

The perils of retreat and recovery
85
The peasants in triumph
87
Cooperative socialism?
95
The accursed nepmen
97
Workers and industrial recovery
100
The intelligentsia in limbo
113
The ingathering of nations
117
Rises and falls within the party
126
The crisis of the working class
203
The crisis of the intelligentsia
214
Epilogue and conclusion
224
Notes
230
Bibliography
265
Index
280
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