Arbeiterkultur Im Gesellschaftlichen Konflikt

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 24, 1996 - Drama - 244 pages
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With the exception of the occasional local case study, music-hall history has until now been presented as the history of the London halls. This book attempts to redress the balance by setting music-hall history within a national perspective. Kift also sheds a new light on the roles of managements, performers and audiences. For example, the author confutes the commonly held assumption that most women in the halls were prostitutes and shows them to have been working women accompanied by workmates of both sexes or by their families. She argues that before the 1890s the halls catered predominantly to working-class and lower middle-class audiences of men and women of all ages and were instrumental in giving them a strong and self-confident identity. The hall's ability to sustain a distinct class-awareness was one of their greatest strengths - but this factor was also at the root of many of the controversies which surrounded them. These controversies are at the centre of the book and Kift treats them as test cases for social relations which provide fresh insights into nineteenth-century British society and politics.
 

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Great for Resources!!!!

Contents

Programme cover of Mosss Liverpool Empire 1900 Authors
1
History
17
Sheffield Archives
26
The musichall programme
36
Cover of the sheet music for J B Geoghegans song England
44
The Idyllic Mr Punchs Model Music Hall by F Anstey
50
Poster for the Millstone Concert Hall Bolton 1850s Bolton
56
The audience
62
Coloured underdraws sic as worn by cancan dancers
119
The special case of London 18401888
135
Controversies in the 1890s
155
Conclusion
175
Notes
185
Bibliography
215
Index
237
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