Pennsylvania in American History

Front Cover
W.J. Campbell, 1910 - Pennsylvania - 494 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 153 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 115 - That a committee, in conjunction with one from the Senate, be appointed to consider on the most suitable manner of paying honor to the memory of the man, first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his fellow-citizens.
Page 201 - That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to -the dictates of their own consciences ; that no man can, of right, be compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent; that no human authority can, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience ; and that no preference shall ever be given, by law, to any religious establishments or modes of worship.
Page 98 - A hundred men with each a pen, Or more upon my word, sir, It is most true would be too few, Their valor to record, sir.
Page 431 - The Court agree to give Four Hundred Pounds towards a School or College, whereof Two Hundred Pounds shall be paid the next year, and Two Hundred Pounds when the work is finished, and the next Court to appoint where and what building.
Page 276 - Fatland and other fords in the neighbourhood of it. They marched immediately towards Philadelphia, and I imagine their advanced parties will be near that city to-night. They had so far got the start before I received certain intelligence that any considerable number had crossed...
Page 156 - I am well satisfied, that no such thing is desired by any thinking man in all North America ; on the contrary, that it is the ardent wish of the warmest advocates for liberty, that peace and tranquillity, upon constitutional grounds, may be restored, and the horrors of civil discord prevented.
Page 455 - A school or schools shall be established in each county by the legislature for the convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters paid by the public as may enable them to instruct youth at low prices: And all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted in one or more universities.
Page 177 - ... a lower yet,) an emanation of the same divine Power, that is both author and object of pure religion, the difference lying here, that the one is more free and mental, the other more corporal and compulsive in its operations, but that is only to evil-doers, government itself being otherwise as capable of kindness, goodness, and charity, as a more private society.
Page 318 - He spoke of wrongs too long endured, Of sacred rights to be secured; Then from his patriot tongue of flame The startling words for freedom came. The stirring sentences he spake Compelled the heart to glow or quake, And, rising on his theme's broad wing, And grasping in his nervous hand The imaginary battle-brand, In face of death he dared to fling Defiance to a tyrant king.

Bibliographic information