Aerial Interdiction: Air Power and the Land Battle in Three American Wars

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DIANE Publishing, 1995 - 432 pages
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Examines the practice of air interdiction in three wars: World War II, the Korean War, & the war in Southeast Asia. The author proposes a realistic objective for interdiction: preventing men, equipment, & supplies from reaching the combat area when the enemy needs them & in the amount he requires. Bibliography & index. Contains over 100 charts, tables, maps, & photos.
 

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Contents

III
1
IV
9
V
19
VI
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VII
81
VIII
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IX
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X
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XII
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XIII
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Popular passages

Page 231 - I am not prepared to impose from this distance any restriction on military action by the responsible commanders that in their opinion might militate against the success of "Overlord" or cause additional loss of life to our Allied forces of invasion.
Page 230 - I don't want any part of the blame. After it fails, we can show them how we can win by bombing."3 The tide, however, was against him, even though other opponents assembled formidable arguments against the Transportation Plan.
Page v - Air operations conducted to destroy, neutralize, or delay the enemy's military potential before it can be brought to bear effectively against friendly forces, at such distance from friendly forces that detailed integration of each air mission with the fire and movement of friendly forces is not required.
Page 216 - ... and could be less effectively supported from the air, but would nevertheless produce the greatest political and strategic impact if it were to succeed. During the opening phase of the battle, the entire striking power of the enemy will of necessity be directed against our forces manning the coast. Only an all-out effort in the construction of fortifications, an unsurpassed effort that will enlist all available manpower and physical resources of Germany and the occupied areas, will be able to...
Page 30 - ... the most important target at a particular time will usually be that target which constitutes the most serious threat to the operations of the supported ground force.
Page 262 - Knaack, Encyclopedia of US Air Force Aircraft and Missile Systems, vol. 1, Post-World War II Fighters, 1945-1973 (Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History, 1978), 55.
Page 268 - Robert F. Futrell, The United States Air Force in Korea, 1950-1953, rev. ed. (Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History, 1983), 480-85; and General OP Weyland, transcript of oral history interview by Dr.
Page 399 - THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS, Washington, DC The Committee on Armed Services, and the Subcommittee on the Department of Defense of the Committee on Appropriations, met jointly, pursuant to recess, at 10 am, in room S-127, US Capitol Building, Hon.
Page 9 - There were few major outbreaks between the end of the Napoleonic Wars and the beginning of World War I.
Page 16 - Air warfare cannot be separated into little packets; it knows no boundaries on land or sea other than those imposed by the radius of action of the aircraft; it is a unity and demands unity of command . " 2 ' CINCPAC allocated Navy targets to the Commander of TF-77 through CINCPACFLT and the Commander of 7th Fleet.

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