Heroes of the Storm

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1904 - Lifesaving - 281 pages
 

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Page 280 - I cannot do better here than to quote from the report of the general superintendent of the Life-Saving Service touching this memorable achievement of the Ship Canal crew : " To have come rushing through the night and tempest over so many snowy leagues to the rescue of a group of despairing sailors, and then, with hearts greater than danger, to have gone out again and again through the dreadful breakers and brought every man ashore, was a feat so boldly adventurous that the current accounts of it...
Page 168 - ... SERVICE REPORTS Author's note: These reports were taken directly from the Life Saving Service Reports at the United States Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, DC They have not been edited since the style best portays the mood of the time. WRECK OF THE JO MOSS A third wreck, involving loss of life, took place on the 24th of November, 1882, four miles north of the Grand Point au Sable Station, Lake Michigan. The vessel was the schooner JO Moss...
Page 183 - ... from the beginning. His crew were in the house, with the exception of one man out on patrol on the north pier. The moment the schooner capsized he sprang back shouting to the crew to launch the boat. The station is on the edge of the pier, and with one rush the men poured out, shoving the boat into the water, and tumbled in with alacrity. The tug Johnson was lying near the station, and at once took them in tow, giving them an opportunity to put on their cork jackets, which in their haste they...
Page 185 - In a moment he sang out to the man in the main crosstrees that he was going to take off the three men in the main shrouds first, as they were in the most danger, to which the man assented.
Page 85 - The horses were then put on again, but a lower portion of the coast being soon reached, the water got so deep and the sand cut away so fast under the wheels, that they could not draw, and the men took the burden in hand and tugged with it until they came abreast the wreck, which was between nine and ten o'clock. There they met and were reinforced by Keeper Britton C.
Page 34 - ... Of the twenty men aboard but one escaped — thrown bruised and bleeding upon the shore, where he was found and tenderly cared for by the patrolman. Had an army of lifesavers been present, no help could in this instance have been rendered to either vessel or crew. These hapless voyagers had been out three months, and over ten thousand miles, to perish within three hours
Page 140 - ¡irouud the cape for two miles, in storms at flood-tides, a heavy sea swings across the low and somewhat shelving beach, in among its bordering hummocks, and back again with violence, ploughing gullies as it runs. The surf makes the sand a quag, quicksands form in the gullies, and the solitary patrolman, making his way along the top of the beach in the darkness by the dim light of his lantern, faces the chances of destruction, being liable to be swept off his feet by the rush or refluence of the...
Page 144 - ... by cold and hunger and the many hours of horror he had undergone, broke from the keeper's hold and clambered up the rigging again. The boat was hauled back a little, and the keeper spoke up cheerily, encouraging the men in the crosstrees, and declaring they would all be saved. Presently, the line was again slacked, the boat veered down, and the mate once more descended. His fright again seized him, but the keeper, forewarned, got a mighty hold, and by sheer force jerked him out of the rigging...
Page 101 - ... as yet unpierced, which bristled along the crest of the eminence, and in which lay fallen trees half buried in brush and dense undergrowth. The obstacle seemed to inspire all present with a sudden electric energy, and gave occasion for a striking and admirable scene. In an instant, and as by a simultaneous impulse, all hands, citizens and crew, flung themselves upon the wood with axes and handspikes, and a work began which resembled a combat. The hill-top resounded with the blows of the implements,...
Page 143 - ... management of the boat. Finally, at about half-past 7 o'clock, two hours after starting, the life-saving crew arrived near the wrecked schooner. She was completely sunk, her hull all under. Only her two masts stuck up from the swirling water, and perched up in the main cross-trees, wrapped in the main-gaff topsail, were huddled the four wretched survivors of her crew of five. After three or four daring and dangerous attempts to get near, baffled by the strong current and the vast commotion of...

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