Tuna: A Love Story

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jul 15, 2008 - Nature - 320 pages
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Famed marine researcher and illustrator Richard Ellis brings us a work of scientific achievement that will forever change the way we think about fish, fishing, and the dangers inherent in the seafood we eat.

The bluefin tuna is one of the world's biggest, fastest, and most highly evolved marine animals, as well as one of its most popular delicacies. Now, however, it hovers on the brink of extinction. Here Ellis explains how a fish that was once able to thrive has become a commodity—and how the natural world and the global economy converge on our plates. With updated information on mercury levels in tuna, this is at once an astounding ode to one of nature's greatest marvels and a serious examination of a creature and world at risk.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kenno82 - LibraryThing

Ellis' description of tuna farming was eye-opening, as was the state of the bluefin tuna fishery. One has to wonder just how long the fishery can be sustained while the japanese market for a-grade ... Read full review

TUNA: A Love Story

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Smooth-flowing distillation of scholarship about "the world's best-loved fish."Ellis (Singing Whales and Flying Squid: The Discovery of Marine Life, 2006, etc.) has an authorial voice that's easy on ... Read full review

Contents

37
3
A CELEBRATION OF TUNA
21
THE FRATERNITY OF BIG TunA
45
SPORT FISHING FORTUNA
85
comMERCIALTUNA Fish ERIES
129
Fishing For MAGuro
140
TUNA FARMING
159
THE BlueFins Popular
183
THE TUNA IndustRY
215
CAN WE SAVE THE BLUEFIN?
237
EMIN ENT DOMAIN
293
INDEX
321
85
327
282
334
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About the author (2008)

Richard Ellis is the author of more than a dozen books. He is also a celebrated marine artist whose paintings have been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world. He has written and illustrated articles for numerous magazines, including Audubon, National Geographic, Smithsonian, and Scientific American. He lives in New York City.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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