The History of Peter the Great, Emperor of Russia: To which is Prefixed a Short General History of the Country from the Rise of that Monarchy : and an Account of the Author's Life, Volume 1

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F. Douglass and W. Murray; sold by C. Hitch and L. Hawes ... London ... and at Aberdeen by the said F. Douglass and W. Murray, 1755 - Russia
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Contents

I
1
II
55
III
97
IV
133
V
161
VI
177
VII
225
VIII
287

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Page 105 - ... gave his opinion that the safest and most expeditious way to become masters of the town, would be to carry on before them a whole rampart of earth along the front of the town, which, as they advanced, would hourly increase. By having ten or twelve thousand men night and day at work, said he, we shall carry and roll as much earth before us, as will not only be sufficient to fill up the fosse, but will have more over and above than will exceed the height of the town walls ; by which means, in a...
Page 105 - Gordon, as the oldest general, gave his opinion that the safest and most expeditious way to become masters of the town, would be to carry on before them a whole rampart of earth along the front of the town, which, as they advanced, would hourly increase. By having...
Page 105 - Generals about the safest and most expeditious method of becoming masters of the place. Most of them delivered their sentiments in the common way, by carrying on attacks, making of great breaches, with mines and batteries, which (they said) would infallibly oblige the Governor to capitulate in the terms of war, or expect the worst. Then General Patrick Gordon, as the oldest General, gave his opinion that the safest and most expeditious way to become masters of the town, would be to carry on before...
Page 106 - Czar preferred this opinion, and ordered them to do as he had proposed. So to work they went, and with such cheerfulness, that, within the space of five weeks, the fosse was actually full, and the earth above the height of the ramparts, rolling in over them, which obliged the governor to put out the white flag. The younger Gordon, who was present, adds, that twelve thousand men were constantly at work, who threw the earth from hand to hand, like so many steps of a stair.* After this extraordinary...
Page 136 - The fame author alfo fays of him, greatly to his honour, " General Gordon was a fober man, in a country where drinking is much in fafhion : and though he ufed to be much in the tzar's company, his majefty, knowing his inclinations, would never allow him to be urged. He was ever mindful of his bufinefs, and did great fervice to the Ruffian nation.
Page 107 - Jielng a little too curious, and raising himself too high on the top of the loose earth to observe the enemy. He died of hunger, the eleventh day after he received the wound, not being able to swallow any kind of nourishment. He was a good officer, and much regretted by the Czar, who caused bury him with all the honours of war.
Page 114 - January, where a lodging was prepared for him in York buildings, which the Czar did not like, but in a few days retired from thence to Deptford, that he might the better obferve the fhipping. The Marquis of Carmarthen and Sir Anthony Dean, were the two perfons, in whofe company he delighted moft; the.
Page 106 - ... opinion, and told them to do as he proposed. So to work they went with such cheerfulness, that, within the space of five weeks, the fosse was actually full, and the earth above the height of the ramparts rolling in over them ; which obliged the Governor to put out the white flag. Though this seems to be a very extraordinary and uncommon method of taking towns, yet here it proved very successful and safe, the loss of men during the siege not amounting to above three hundred. According to General...
Page 106 - Though this seems to be a very extraordinary and uncommon method of taking towns, yet here it proved very successful and safe, the loss of men during the siege not amounting to above three hundred. According to General Gordon's plan, there were constantly twelve thousand men at work, who threw the earth from hand to hand, like so many steps of a stair. The greatest danger was at the top, the earth being so loose, especially as they advanced nearer the town, that the enemy's small shot killed and...
Page xvi - ... we are free to confess that we do not respect his memory a whit the less, because, after he had won many a battle for the Czar, and had retired to his own fire-side, he turned out in 1715, and, under the Earl of Mar, directed (if he did not really command) the Highland clans with such skill, ' that any advantage they had over the king's troops was generally attributed to his conduct.'^ If Mr. Bremner had read this old Sheriffmuir hero's honest book, he would have spared us certain theories and...

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