Framed Structures and Girders: Theory and Practice. Volume I, Stresses, | ...

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McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1911 - Girders - 540 pages
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Contents

CHAPTER II
11
Resolution and Combination of Forces
12
Conditions of Equilibrium of Coplanar Forces
14
Laws of Equilibrium in Terms of Moments
16
Concurrent Forces Equilibrant by Force Polygon
17
Nonconcurrent Forces Equilibrant by Equilibrium Poly
20
gon
24
Single Support
28
To Pass an Equilibrium Polygon through Three Given
38
Relations between Shears and Bending Moments
45
Moment Diagram for Broken Uniform Loading
52
Liveload Systems
58
ART PAGE
59
Diagram of Maximum Shears from Coopers E60 Loading
69
Greatest Possible Bending Moment in a Beam from a Con
76
Series of Floorbeam Loads
86
Laws of Equilibrium Applied to Stresses
92
Stresses in Trusses by Graphic Method Maxwell Diagrams
98
ABT FACE 54 Scissors Truss
102
Problem
103
Crane Truss
106
NONCONCURRENT STRESSES 57 Method of Moments
109
Method of Shears
110
Method of Coefficients
113
Graphic Methods
116
Graphic vs Algebraic Methods
118
CHAPTER VI
121
Standard Types of Trusses
123
Length of Bays
127
Wind Pressure
129
Wind Pressure on Inclined Surfaces
132
Wind Pressures on Roofs and Buildings
134
Snow Loads
136
Combined Wind and Snow Loads
137
Stresses in a Pratt Truss
138
Reversed Stresses Maximum and Minimum Stresses
148
Roof Truss with Chords of Varying Inclinations
149
Counters
151
Windload Stresses in Trusses Supported on Columns
154
a Columns Hinged at Base
155
b Columns Fixed at Base
158
Formulas for Weight of Roof Trusses
163
Threehinged Arch
164
CHAPTER VII
167
Assumed Distribution ok Dead Load
168
Counterbalanced Loading
169
Counters Initial Stress
170
ART iA0
174
Double Triangular Truss
191
Chord Stresses
204
Pratt Truss
210
Howe Truss
216
AKT PAGE 107 Triangular Truss
217
c Chord Stresses
218
6 Odd Number of Panels
219
Problem
220
STRESSES FROM CONCENTRATED LIVE LOADS 110 General Considerations
221
Mathematical Significance of the Criterion for Maximum
226
Application of Moment Table to Finding Position of Loading to Satisfy Criterion for Maximum Stress
227
Examples
228
Application of Moment Table to Finding the Values of Moments
229
ExampleLiveload Stresses in Pratt Truss
230
Approximate Checks for Liveload Stresses
232
6 Chord Stresses
233
Position of Loading for Maximum Chord Stress
236
Problem
237
Special Case Chord Stresses in Middle Panel of Truss with Odd Number of Panels
238
Example
240
Howe Truss
241
Trusses with More than One Web System
243
E STRESSES FROM UNIFORM LIVE LOAD EXACT METHOD 123 Introduction
244
Pratt Truss
245
Example
249
Triangular Truss
250
Approximate Check for Liveload Web Stresses from a Con
251
Lever Arms in Terms of Panel Lengths
256
Graphic Method
263
Liveload Stresses from Concentrated Loading
271
Liveload Stresses from Uniform Load by the Conventional
333
Pratt Truss with Inclined Chords and Subpanels Pettit
340
Liveload Stresses from Uniform Load Conventional
348
Chord Stresses from Concentrated Live Loads
357
ART PAOE 167 Chord Stresses in Middle Panel of a Pettit Truss with Odd Number of Panels
359
Example Liveload Stresses in a Pettit Truss
360
Tension in Posts
363
Double Triangular Truss with Subpanels
364
CHAPTER XI
367
Construction of Load Line
368
The Moment Line as an Equilibrium Polygon
369
Reactions by Graphic Method Shear in a Beam
371
Maximum Web Stresses in a Truss with Inclined Chords
372
Another Form of Moment Line
374
B INFLUENCE LINES 180 Definition of Influence Line
376
6 Uniform Load
377
a Concentrated Loads
378
b Uniform Load
379
Reactions by Reaction Polygon
380
b Uniform Load
381
Bending Moments by Reaction Polygon
382
Comparison of Graphic Methods
383
a Concentrated Loads
384
Use of Influence Lines
385
Influence Line between Successive Loaded Panel Points
386
ABT PAOI
387
Influence Line for Web Stresses in a Truss with Subpanels
397
Influence Table
404
Assumed Distribution of Loading
410
Example
417
ART FAOE
423
Vertical Loads on Floor Beams
430
Conventional Equivalent Load Systems
437
General Comparison of Train and Engine Load Systems with
443
CHAPTER XIV
449
Wind Pressures
450
b Highway Bridges
451
Assumed Distribution of Lateral For es
452
Stresses in Lateral Bracing
453
Load and Reactions
454
Effect of End Conditions at Bottom of Posts
455
Portal with Diagonal Bracing
457
b Graphic Method
458
Portal with Triangular Bracing
459
PLATEaiRDER PORTAL
462
Lattice Portal
464
Skew Portal
466
End Bracing in Deck Bridges
467
246 Sway Bracing for Singletrack Bridges
469
6 Through Bridges
470
b Through Bridges
472
a Maximum Tension in Lower Chord
473
b Maximum Compression in Lower Chord Reversed Stresses
475
CHAPTER XV
478
Loads
479
SYMMETRICAL BENT 252 Stresses from Dead Load
482
Stresses from Live Load
483
Stresses from Centrifugal Forces
488
Governing Combinations of Stresses
490
Stresses in Bottom Transverse Strut
492
Stresses in Anchorage
493
UNSYMMETRICAL BENT OR UNSYMMETRICAL VERTICAL LOAD 261 Viaducts on Curves
495
Doubletrack Viaducts
497
CHAPTER XVI
500
Application of Algebraic Method
502
Example
503
Check for Values of Displacement Factor
505
Displacements of the Apexes of a Truss Graphic Method 506 268 Truss fixed at one support and direction of one mem ber unchanged
506
6 Multitriangular Frame
508
General case
510
Displacements due to rotation
511
Example General case
512
Reciprocity of Deflections and Loads Maxwells Law
514
Influence Line for Deflection
515
Camber Computations by Approximate Methods
516
Camber Computations by Exact Method
518
Stresses from Inclined Loads 100
521
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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 450 - To provide for wind strains and vibrations from high-speed trains, the top lateral bracing in deck bridges, and the bottom lateral bracing in through bridges, shall be proportioned to resist a lateral force of 600 pounds for each foot of the span ; 450 pounds of this to be treated as a moving load, and as acting on a train of cars, at a line 6 feet above base of rail.
Page 254 - ... the algebraic sum of the vertical components of the stresses in the chord members that meet the vertical at the other end.
Page 11 - The moment of a force about a point is the product of the magnitude of the force by the perpendicular distance from the point to the line of action of the force.
Page 483 - Ibs. per sq. ft. on the same surface plus 400 lbs. per linear ft. of structure applied 7 ft. above the rail for assumed wind force on train, when the structure is either fully loaded or loaded on either track with empty cars assumed to weigh 1,200 Ibs. per linear ft., whichever gives the larger stress.
Page 175 - Center, except the hip vertical, is equal to the vertical component of the stress in the diagonal in the panel to the right, plus the load at the joint of the unloaded chord.
Page 7 - BC is the distance through which the body has moved in the direction of the force, so that the work done in the given time is measured by F x BC.
Page 49 - ... —1,600 foot-pounds at point B. From point B to the right, positive area of the shear diagram is added until at the point C the moment becomes...
Page 43 - To find the moment at any point, remember that the bending moment is the algebraic sum of the moments of the forces to the left of the section under consideration and that moment is the value of force times distance.
Page 7 - The work done by a force upon a body is measured by the product of the force and the distance through which the body moves in the direction of the force.
Page 44 - ... =1,000 pounds, and the load per foot including weight of the beam is 200 pounds. The forces acting on the beam to the left of the first section, two feet from the left end, are the left reaction (1,000 pounds) and the load (including weight) on the part of the beam to the left of the section (400 pounds). The arm of the reaction is 2 feet and that of the 400-pound force is 1 foot (the distance from the middle of the 400-pound load to the section). Hence M2= + 1,000 X 2-400 X 1= + 1,600 foot-pounds.

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