Creston

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Arcadia Publishing, 2011 - History - 127 pages
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Creston sprang to life on the summit of the high prairie, where railroad officials pitched their camp one night in 1868. Creston was chosen as the division point between the Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers. The railroad brought its machine shops; roundhouse, and a rip-roaring, brawling construction camp to the new town. By 1869, the area was platted and construction began. Creston became an overnight industrial and transportation center, earning the nickname of "Little Chicago." In 1879, Robert Louis Stevenson implied that the Wild West began in Creston. He reported his first encounter with the open display of handguns in Creston when a passenger, without a ticket, was thrown from a moving train. He later wrote, "They were speaking English all around me, but I knew I was in a foreign land. It was the first indication that I had come among revolvers, and I observed it with some emotion."
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
6
Palace City
23
Cigars Saloons and an Amusement Park
37
The Agricultural Resilience
65
An Era of Change and Growth
91
Honoring the Past
111
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Dianne R. Osmun has selected a variety of images, with the help of the Union County Historical Society, several longtime residents, and others that illustrate the evolution of a rough and rowdy railroad town to a thriving city that is now the county seat of Union County. Osmun is an active community member, including vice president of the Union County Historic Preservation Commission, with a background in historic architecture.

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