Shakespeare's Comedy of the Merchant of Venice

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Hurd & Houghton, 1868 - 87 pages
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Contents

I
iii
II
15
III
30
IV
52
V
64
VI
78

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Page 81 - That light we see is burning in my hall. How far that little candle throws his beams ! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
Page 80 - How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold; There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins: Such harmony is in immortal souls; But, whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we...
Page 70 - The quality of mercy is not strain'd, — It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath : it is twice bless'd, — It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes : 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest...
Page 28 - Hath a dog money ? is it possible A cur can lend three thousand ducats ? ' Or Shall I bend low and in a bondman's key, With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this ; ' Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last ; You spurn'd me such a day ; another time You call'd me dog ; and for these courtesies I'll lend you thus much moneys
Page 79 - In such a night Did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew, And, with an unthrift love, did run from Venice As far as Belmont. Jes. In such a night...
Page viii - it is twice blessed — It blesses him that gives and him that takes," does he not utter beautiful poetry as well as unquestionable truth?
Page 19 - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them : and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
Page 70 - It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this scepter'd sway; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself: And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
Page 71 - Yes, here I tender it for him in the court ; Yea, twice the sum : if that will not suffice, I will be bound to pay it ten times o'er, On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart. If this will not suffice, it must appear That malice bears down truth. And I beseech you, Wrest once the law to your authority : To do a great right, do a little wrong, And curb this cruel devil of his will.
Page 75 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.

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