Urban Ecology: An International Perspective on the Interaction Between Humans and Nature

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John Marzluff
Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 3, 2008 - Science - 808 pages
2 Reviews
to a Research Project Ernest W. Burgess Abstract The aggregation of urban population has been described by Bücher and Weber. A soc- logical study of the growth of the city, however, is concerned with the de nition and description of processes, as those of (a) expansion, (b) metabolism, and (c) mobility. The typical tendency of urban growth is the expansion radially from its central business district by a series of concentric circles, as (a) the central business district, (b) a zone of deterioration, (c) a zone of workingmen’s homes, (d)a residential area, and (e) a commuters’ zone. Urban growth may be even more fundamentally stated as the resultant of processes of organization and disorganization, like the anabolic and katabolic processes of metabolism in the human body. The distribution of population into the natural areas of the city, the division of labor, the differentiation into social and cultural groupings, represent the normal manifestations of urban metabolism, as statistics of disease, crime, disorder, vice, insanity, and suicide are rough indexes of its abnormal expression. The state of metabolism of the city may, it is suggested, be measured by mobility, de ned as a change of movement in response to a new stimulus or situation. Areas in the city of the greatest mobility are found to be also regions of juvenile delinquency, boys’ gangs, crime, poverty, wife desertion, divorce, abandoned infants, etc.
 

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Contents

Urbanization and Human Domination of Earth
1
Human Domination of Earths Ecosystems
3
Humans as the Worlds Greatest Evolutionary Force
14
Urbanization
25
Differences in the use of Urban Between the Social and Natural Sciences
49
Conceptual Foundations of Urban Ecology
67
An Introduction to a Research Project
70
On the Early History of Urban Ecology in Europe
79
Does Differential Access to Protein Influence Differences in Timing of Breeding of Florida ScrubJays Aphelocoma coerulescens in Suburban and Wi...
390
Creating a Homogeneous Avifauna
405
Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Urbanizations Impacts on Fish
425
Patterns at the Landscape and Microhabitat Scale
437
Influences of Human Modification of Habitat Structure and Productivity
455
The Anthroposphere Human Dimensions
473
Social Science Concepts and Frameworks for Understanding Urban Ecosystems
475
Human Economic Behavior in Ecological Models
484

Linking Terrestrial Ecological Physical and Socioeconomic Components of Metropolitan Areas
99
Integrated Approaches to LongTerm Studies of Urban Ecological Systems
123
Opportunities and Challenges for Studying Urban Ecosystems
142
The Atmosphere Hydrosphere and Pedosphere
159
Sealing of Soils
161
The Moral Economy of the American Lawn
180
Streams in the Urban Landscape
207
The Urban Climate Basic and Applied Aspects
232
Global Warming and the Urban Heat Island
249
The Role of Influenza and Pollution
263
Heat Waves Urban Climate and Human Health
269
The Biosphere
279
The City as a Subject for Ecological Research
281
Ecosystem Processes Along an UrbantoRural Gradient
299
Rapid Evolution of Races in North America
315
On the Role of Alien Species in Urban Flora and Vegetation
321
Socioeconomics Drive Urban Plant Diversity
339
Fauna of the Big City Estimating Species Richness and Abundance in Warsaw Poland
348
How Extinction and Colonization May Determine Biological Diversity in HumanDominated Landscapes
355
A LongTerm Survey of the Avifauna in an Urban Park
373
Changes Caused by Agriculture and Urbanisation
377
Forecasting Demand for Urban Land
493
A Literature Review
519
Why Cities Cannot be Sustainableand Why They are a Key to Sustainability
537
Health Supportive Environments and the Reasonable Person Model
556
Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Physical Activity Obesity and Morbidity
567
Megacities as Global Risk Areas
583
Why Is Understanding Urban Ecosystems Important to People Concerned About Environmental Justice?
597
The Anthroposphere Planning and Policy
606
The Struggle to Govern the Commons
611
A Conceptual Framework
623
Scientific Institutional and Individual Constraints on Restoring Puget Sound Rivers
647
Shifts in the Core and the Context of Urban Forest Ecology
660
What Is the Form of a City and How Is It Made?
677
What Should an Ideal City Look Like from an Ecological View? Ecological Demands on the Future City
691
Land Use Planning and Wildlife Maintenance Guidelines for Conserving Wildlife in an Urban Landscape
698
Terrestrial Nature Reserve Design at the UrbanRural Interface
715
A General Framework and Specific Recommendations for Urbanizing Landscapes
738
A Straightforward Approach
757
A New Planning Concept for the Environment of Asian MegaCities
782
Index
797
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About the author (2008)

Marzluff is assistant professor of wildlife science in the Ecosystem Science and Conservation Division at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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