The Jews of Pinsk, 1506 to 1880

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Stanford University Press, 2008 - History - 606 pages
The Jews of Pinsk, 1506-1880 is the first part of a major scholarly project about a small city in Eastern Europe where Jews were a majority of the population from the end of the eighteenth century. Pinsk boasted both traditional rabbinic scholars and famous Hasidic figures, and over time became an international trade emporium, a center of the Jewish Enlightenment, a cradle of Zionism and the Jewish Labor movement, and a place where Orthodoxy struggled vigorously with modernity.

The two volumes of Pinsk history were originally part of a literature created by Jews who survived the Holocaust and were determined to keep in memory a vital world that flourished for half a millennium. In this case, the results are extraordinary: no town of Eastern Europe has been described in such fascinating detail, invaluable to Jewish and non-Jewish historians alike.

For the second volume of this two-volume collection, see The Jews of Pinsk, 1881-1941.
 

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Contents

Pinsk A Novelist in the Blottes хvіі
xvii
Introduction to Pinsk Translation
xxxiii
List of Abbreviations
xlvii
Introduction by Mordechai Nadav I Introduction by Mordechai Nadav
6
From the Founding of the Community
13
Chmielnicki Persecutions 15691648
59
6
132
From the Chmielnicki Persecutions of 16481649
141
The Haskalah
400
Educational Institutions
428
Secondary Education
437
Societies and Benevolent Institutions
454
Hospitals
459
The Court
468
Hasidism in the Second Third of the Nineteenth Century
489
Summary of the History of the Pinsk Jewish Community
495

From the Peace of Andruszow Until the Conquest
193
From the Conquest of Pinsk by the Swedes Until
242
From the Russian Annexation of Pinsk Until
312
3
382
Notes
505
Bibliography
585
Index
603
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Mordechai Nadav is a leading Israeli scholar of Eastern European Jewry. His Hebrew version of this volume was published in 1973. Mark Mirsky is Professor of English at the City College of New York and Editor of the literary magazine, Fiction. Moshe Rosman is Professor of Jewish History at Bar Ilan University, Israel. His books include Founder of Hasidism (1996 in English, 1999 in Hebrew), winner of The National Jewish Book Award (1996) and of The Shazar Prize for Best Book in Jewish History (2000).

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