Wallace's Monthly, Volume 17

Front Cover
Benjamin Singerly, Publisher, 1891 - Horses
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Page 336 - And if a man cause a blemish in his neighbour; as he hath done, so shall it be done to him ; breach for breach, eye for eye, tooth for tooth: as he hath caused a blemish in a man, so shall it be done to him again.
Page 336 - If a bird's nest chance to be before thee in the way in any tree, or on the ground, whether they be young ones, or eggs, and the dam sitting upon the young, or upon the eggs, thou shalt not take the dam with the young: But thou shalt in any wise let the dam go, and take the young to thee; that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest prolong thy days.
Page 291 - I believe that every antelope in South Africa has to run for its life every one or two days upon an average, and that he starts or gallops under the influence of a false alarm many times in a day. Those who have crouched at night by the side of pools in the desert, in order to have a shot at the beasts that frequent them, see strange scenes of animal life ; how the creatures gambol at one moment and fight at another ; how a herd suddenly halts in strained attention,, and then breaks into a maddened...
Page 44 - ... horses, which includes the wild horses and donkeys of Asia, the zebras, the mustangs, the cimarrones of the Pampas, and the half-wild horses of Mongolia and Siberia. They all live in numerous associations made up of many studs, each of which consists of a number of mares under the leadership of a male. These numberless inhabitants of the Old and the New World, badly organized on the whole for resisting both their numerous enemies and the adverse conditions of climate would soon have disappeared...
Page 342 - I would not enter on my list of friends (Though graced with polished manners and fine sense Yet wanting sensibility) the man Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
Page 340 - And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.
Page 121 - It should, however, never be lost sight of that the shorter, the sharper, and the smaller the calkins are, so long as they answer the purpose which called them into existence, so much the better for the foot that wears them. High calkins, while they confer no firmer foothold, are potent means of inflicting injury both on the foot itself and the superincumbent limb at large. It is only from that portion of the catch which enters the ground surface that the horse derives any benefit in the shape of...
Page 358 - Punctured wounds are produced by the penetration of a sharp or blunt-pointed substance, such as a thorn, fork, nail, etc., and the orifice of these wounds is always small in proportion to their depth. In veterinary practice punctured wounds are much more common than the others. They involve the feet most frequently, next the legs, and often the head and face from nails protruding through the stalls and trough. They are not only the most frequent, but they are also the most serious, owing to the difficulty...
Page 299 - Company, was when this suit was brought and is now, a corporation created under the laws of the State of New York having its principal office and place of business in the city of New York in...
Page 121 - Thanks to the amount of attention which every detail that could possibly tend to the more perfect development of that paragon of horseflesh, the American trotter, has received at the hands of all classes of men, the matter of shoeing for specific purposes has made greater progress in America than in any other country on the face of the globe...

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