The Delft Systems Approach: Analysis and Design of Industrial Systems

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, May 23, 2008 - Technology & Engineering - 223 pages
0 Reviews
This book is a tribute to Prof. Jan in ‘t Veld, who is the real founder of the Delft Systems Approach. Until a few days before he died in 2005, he was working on the English translation of his successful book Analyse van Organisatie-problemen. The eighth edition of the book appeared in the Netherlands in 2002; it represents 50 years of experience, discussion and application of a systems approach that was gradually developed and sharply defined by him. About 85,000 copies of the book had been sold by then. Unfortunately he was not able to finish the translation. The writers of this book are convinced of the value of his approach and decided to finish his work. The chapters of the Dutch book that had already been translated (by A.M.P. O’Brien) are included here with only minor changes made to them (Chapts. 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 9). However, we extended the theory with a conceptual view of behaviour modelling, a view that was approved by in ‘t Veld himself. Besides this, in ‘t Veld started his work from a purely managerial viewpoint.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
1
12 Theory and Practice
2
13 Conceptual Approach
5
14 The Structure of this Book
7
References
8
Systems Concepts
9
22 Subsystems and Aspectsystems
13
221 Subsystem
14
652 Characteristics of Periods
123
653 Aggregation
128
Simulation of the Flight Department
131
67 Conclusions
133
References
134
The Case of the Ship Engine Factory
135
72 Description of the Existing Situation
136
Analysis Based Upon the PROPER Model
139

23 State Process and Behaviour
17
232 Process
19
233 Behaviour
20
24 Goal Function and Task
21
25 System and Environment
25
26 Some Other Definitions
27
References
28
Case The Flight Department
29
32 Problem Description
30
33 Problem Analysis
31
34 Complications Due to Bad Weather
38
35 Radar Complications
44
36 Dispersion of Variables and the Required Number of Radar Test Cars
48
37 Results in Practice
55
References
57
Models for the Structuring of Processes
58
42 Determination of Subsystems
60
43 System Control
62
432 Process Control
65
433 Boundary Zone on the Input Side
71
434 Boundary Zone on the Output Side
73
44 Supporting Processes
75
Combining the Models into One Model
77
46 Testing a Works Process Planning Department Against Reality
81
47 Nurses Effect
82
The Health Insurance Company1
86
49 Some Applications in Practice
90
References
92
Conceptual Model for the Analysis of Industrial Systems
95
52 Other Conceptual Models
96
522 The Viable System Model
97
53 Common Characteristics of the Conceptual Models
98
54 The PROPER Model of Industrial Systems
101
55 The PROPER Model and Logistic Practice
103
References
106
Behaviour of a Function The Process
107
62 Behaviour
108
63 The State and Input of an Industrial Function
109
64 The Behaviour of an Industrial System
111
65 Basic Concepts of Process Descriptions
119
Analysis Based Upon the Steadystate Model
141
Policy and Performance
147
82 Does an Industrial System Need Policy?
151
83 Considerations When Choosing the Ways and Means
153
84 The Concepts of Productivity Efficiency and Performance
157
85 Application of the Concepts
163
References
168
Model for the Innovation Process
169
912 PolicyMaking
171
913 Confrontation and Tuning
172
914 Development and ReEquipping
173
915 Control of the Innovation Process
174
916 Policy Evaluation
175
917 Innovation and Improvement of Existing Processes
176
93 Policy Evaluation
177
References
179
The Design Process with the Conceptual Models
180
102 The Design Process
182
103 Function Design
185
104 Process Design
189
1042 The Design of Technical Systems
190
1043 The Design of Organisation Systems
192
1044 The Design of Information Systems
194
105 Simulation as a Supporting Tool for the Design of Industrial Systems
195
Case The Automated Container Terminal
197
112 The Project Program
198
113 Functional Requirements
201
114 Application of the PROPER Model
203
1142 The Order Flow
207
1143 The Product Flow
208
1144 The Resource Flow
210
115 Behaviour Descriptions for Productivity Definitions
211
1052 Experiments
214
1153 Results
217
1154 Using the Behaviour Model During the Project
218
116 Conclusions
219
References
220
Index
221
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - Preface. 1.1. THE PURPOSE OF THIS BOOK The purpose of this book is to...

About the author (2008)

Hans P.M. Veeke, Jaap A. Ottjes and GabriŽl Lodewijks all work for the Delft University of Technology in†The Netherlands.