Sketches of moral and mental philosophy

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Page 219 - a brother, or sister, be naked, and destitute of daily " food, and one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, " be ye warmed and filled ; notwithstanding ye give them " not those things which are needful for the body, — what " doth it profit ? Even so faith, if it hath not works, is
Page 147 - an act of the mind, knowingly, exerting that dominion it takes itself to have over any part of the man, by employing it in, or withholding it from any particular action.
Page 101 - Thus, we repeat, He admonishes men to return to God ; to reestablish their original likeness to him ; and He, who is " the brightness of his Father's glory, and the express image of his person...
Page 235 - Wheeling unshaken through the void immense ; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of Caesar's fate, Amid the crowd of patriots ; and his arm Aloft extending, like eternal Jove When guilt brings down the thunder, call'd aloud On Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, And bade the father of his country hail ? For lo ! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, And Rome again is free...
Page 151 - Hume says very well of desire, that — " it arises from good considered simply and aversion from evil. The will again exerts itself, when either the presence of the good or absence of the evil may be attained by any action of the mind or body.
Page 235 - Is aught so fair In all the dewy landscapes of the Spring, In the bright eye of Hesper, or the morn, In Nature's fairest forms, is aught so fair As virtuous friendship? as the candid blush Of him who strives with fortune to be just? The graceful tear that streams for others
Page 151 - With regard to our own actions, we may desire what we do not will, and will what we do not desire; nay, what we have a great aversion to. " A man athirst has a strong desire to drink; but for some particular reason he determines not to gratify his desire.
Page 20 - In the last part of his lectures, he examined those political regulations which are founded, not upon the principle of justice, but that of expediency, and which are calculated to increase the riches, the power, and the prosperity of a State.
Page 235 - Look, then, abroad through Nature, to the range Of planets, suns, and adamantine spheres, Wheeling unshaken through the void immense ; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of...
Page 20 - His course of lectures on this subject was divided into four parts. The first contained Natural Theology; in which he considered the proofs of the being and attributes of God, and those principles of the human mind upon which religion is founded. The second comprehended Ethics, strictly so called, and consisted chiefly of the doctrines which he afterwards published in his Theory of Moral Sentiments.

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