Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Science

Front Cover
David Ebrey
Cambridge University Press, Jun 11, 2015 - Philosophy
Aristotle argued that in theory one could acquire knowledge of the natural world. But he did not stop there; he put his theories into practice. This volume of new essays shows how Aristotle's natural science and philosophical theories shed light on one another. The contributors engage with both biological and non-biological scientific works and with a wide variety of theoretical works, including Physics, Generation and Corruption, On the Soul, and Posterior Analytics. The essays focus on a number of themes, including the sort of explanation provided by matter; the relationship between matter, teleology, and necessity; cosmic teleology; how an organism's soul and faculties relate to its end; how to define things such as sleep, void, and soul; and the proper way to make scientific judgments. The resulting volume offers a rich and integrated view of Aristotle's science and shows how it fits with his larger philosophical theories.
 

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Contents

The matter of sleep
11
Are facts about matter primitive?
46
Blood matter and necessity
61
teleology necessity
79
Aristotle on the cosmological significance of biological
100
the view from the de Anima
119
Two conceptions of soul in Aristotle
137
Aristotles architectonic sciences
163
Varieties of definition
187
Empty words
199
The scientific role of Eulogos in Aristotles Cael II 12
217
Bibliography
241
Index locorum
249
General index
256
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About the author (2015)

David Ebrey is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Northwestern University, Illinois.