Exploring Research

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Prentice Hall, 2000 - Psychology - 336 pages
2 Reviews
The fourth edition of Exploring Research provides an introduction to research methods in a friendly, approachable writing style. The text explores the use of electronic sources as means to enhance research skills, includes discussions about scientific methods, and the most common types of research in the social and behavioral sciences. *Internet research section is thoroughly revised - The text provides practical information on how to harness the power of the www for use as a research tool. *Updated coverage of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 9.0-Appendix A provides an introduction to the basic features of version 9.0, including data entry and analyzing data. *New readings and additional exercises-Incorporates relevant and informative readings and end-of-chapter exercises to further broaden the scope of experiences for the student.

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Contents

The Research Process Coming to Terms
19
Selecting a Problem and Reviewing the Research
47
Sampling and Generalizability
85
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Neil J. Salkind received his PhD from the University of Maryland in Human Development. After teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he remains a professor emeritus in the department of psychology and research in education, where he continues to collaborate with colleagues and work with students. His early interests were in the area of children s cognitive development, and after research in the areas of cognitive style and (what was then known as) hyperactivity, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina s Bush Center for Child and Family Policy. His work then changed direction to focus on child and family policy, specifically the impact of alternative forms of public support on various child and family outcomes. He has delivered more than 150 professional papers and presentations, written more than 100 trade and textbooks, and is the author of "Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics "(SAGE), "Theories of Human Development" (SAGE), and "Exploring Research "(Prentice Hall). He has edited several encyclopedias, including the "Encyclopedia of Human Development", "the Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics", and the recently published "Encyclopedia of Research Design". He was editor of "Child Development Abstracts and Bibliography" for 13 years and lives in Lawrence, Kansas, where he likes to read, swim with the River City Sharks, letterpress print using 1820s technology, bake brownies (see the Excel version of "Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics" for the recipe at http: //www.statisticsforpeople.com), and poke around old Volvos and old houses.

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