Evil And/or/as the Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought

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Harvard Univ Asia Center, 2000 - Religion - 482 pages
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"Other than the devil, there is no Buddha; other than the Buddha, there is no devil." The Chinese monk Siming Zhili (960-1028) uttered this remark as part of his justification for his self-immolation. An exposition of the intent, implications, and resonances of this one sentence, this book expands and unravels the context in which the seeming paradox of the ultimate identity of good and evil is to be understood. In analyzing this idea, Brook Ziporyn provides an overview of the development of Tiantai thought from the fifth through the eleventh centuries in China and contributes to our understanding of Chinese intellectual culture and Chinese Buddhism, as well as to basic ontological, epistemological, and axiological issues of interest in modern philosophy.
 

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Contents

The Question
1
Philosophical Parameters
26
Value and Antivalue in Indian Buddhism
101
Intersubjectivity in the Tiantai Tradition as Understood by Zhili
199
Value and Antivalue in Tiantai Thought
240
nomianism 251 Zhanran on Inherent Evil and Practiced Good
261
Beetle 295 Comparison to Zhiyi and Zhanran 306 Comparison
329
Conclusions and Implications
344
Notes
387
Bibliography
455
Glossary
465
Index
471
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Brook Ziporyn is Assistant Professor of Asian Religion and Philosophy at Northwestern University.

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