Our Army Nurses: Interesting Sketches, Addresses, and Photographs of Nearly One Hundred of the Noble Women who Served in Hospitals and on Battlefields During Our Civil War

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B. Wilkins & Company, 1895 - Military nursing - 548 pages
"[In the Civil War] the army nurse was obliged to respond to duty at all times and in all emergencies. She could not measure her time, sleep, or strength. She was under orders to serve to the fullest. The remarkable experiences which fell to the lot of these women are revealed in the following pages"--Preface.
 

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Page 419 - LET thy gold be cast in the furnace, Thy red gold, precious and bright ; Do not fear the hungry fire, With its caverns of burning light ; And thy gold shall return more precious, Free from every spot and stain ; For gold must be tried by fire, As a heart must be tried by pain...
Page 524 - You know that the Lord Jesus died and rose again for you. You love to sing his praise and to draw near to him in prayer. But remember that this is not all of religion. You must do right as well as pray right. Your lives must be full of kind deeds towards each other, full of gentle and loving affections, full of unselfishness and truth : this is true piety. You must make Monday and Tuesday just as good and pure as Sunday is, remembering that God looks not only at your prayers and your emotions, but...
Page 419 - In the cruel fire of sorrow Cast thy heart, do not faint or wail ; Let thy hand be firm and steady, Do not let thy spirit quail : But wait till the trial is over. And take thy heart again ; For as gold is tried by fire, So a heart must be tried by pain...
Page 526 - ... system, had to be enforced in the daily routine. Moving quietly on with her work of renovation, she took the responsibility of all changes that became necessary ; and such harmony prevailed in the camp that her policy was vindicated as time rolled on. The rate of mortality was lessened, and the hospital was soon considered the best in the department. This was accomplished by a tact and energy which sought no praise, but modestly veiled themselves behind the orders of officials. The management...
Page 523 - Northern air, while the men were moaning with pain, or were restless with fever, and our hearts were sick with pity for the sufferers, I heard a light step upon the stairs; and looking up I saw a young lady enter, who brought with her such an atmosphere of calm and cheerful courage, so much freshness, such an expression of gentle, womanly sympathy, that her mere presence seemed to revive the drooping spirits of the men, and to give a new power of endurance through the long and painful hours of suffering....
Page 35 - Article 5, with the view to quiet the fears of the inhabitants in the vicinity of a battle, who often flee in terror, as well as to secure their assistance, and the comfort of their homes for the care of the wounded, offers military protection, and certain exemptions to all who shall entertain and care for the wounded in their houses.
Page 384 - Imagine a car a little wider than the ordinary one, placed on springs, and having on each side three tiers of berths or cots, suspended by rubber bands. These cots are so arranged as to yield to the motion of the car, thereby avoiding that jolting experienced even on the smoothest and best kept road. I didn't stop to investigate the plan of the car then, for I saw before me, on either hand, a long line of soldiers, shot in almost every conceivable...
Page 420 - As a heart must be tried by pain! In the cruel fire of Sorrow Cast thy heart, do not faint or wail; Let thy hand be firm and steady, Do not let thy spirit quail: But wait till the trial is over, And take thy heart again; For as gold is tried by fire, So a heart must be tried by pain!
Page 523 - ... sympathy with each prostrate sufferer, a sympathy which could read in his eyes his longing for home love and for the presence of some absent one, — in those few minutes hers was indeed an angel ministry. Before she left the room, she sang to them, — first some stirring national melody, then some sweet or plaintive hymn to strengthen the fainting heart ; and I remember how the notes penetrated to every part of the building. Soldiers with less severe wounds, from the rooms above, began to crawl...
Page 527 - ... decoration of the tents to stimulate a most honorable rivalry among them, which soon opened a wide field for displaying ingenuity and taste, so that not only was its standard the highest, but it was the most cheerfully picturesque hospital at City Point. "This Colored Hospital service was one of those extraordinary tasks, out of the ordinary course of army hospital discipline, that none but a woman could execute. It required more than a man's power of endurance, for men fainted and fell under...

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