The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia Under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79

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Yale University Press, 2002 - History - 477 pages
What was the nature of the regime that turned Cambodia into grisly killing fields and murdered or starved to death 1.7 million of the country's eight million inhabitants? In this riveting book, the first definitive account of the Khmer Rouge revolution, a world renowned authority on Cambodia shows how an ideological preoccupation with racist and totalitarian policies led a group of intellectuals to impose genocide on their own country. This edition includes a new preface recounting the fatal disintegration of the Khmer Rouge army, the death of Pol Pot, the United Nations' foray into the struggle to bring his surviving accomplices to justice, and the damning new evidence they could face. Book jacket.
 

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I read this book following a recent visit to Cambodia because I wanted to learn more about Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge. It's not an easy read because the story is largely told through first-hand accounts - and there are a great many - but I think that makes it all the more important to make the effort. 

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This website is so lame, i wanted to read the book, not a stupid review!!!!!!!!

Contents

V
1
VI
31
VII
65
VIII
102
IX
157
X
159
XI
216
XII
251
XIII
311
XIV
313
XV
357
XVI
386
XVII
440
XVIII
467
XIX
471
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