Breathing Lessons

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 2005 - Fiction - 339 pages
20 Reviews
Maggie and Ira Moran have been married for twenty-eight years–and it shows: in their quarrels, in their routines, in their ability to tolerate with affection each other’s eccentricities. Maggie, a kooky, lovable meddler and an irrepressible optimist, wants nothing more than to fix her son’s broken marriage. Ira is infuriatingly practical, a man “who should have married Ann Landers.” And what begins as a day trip to a funeral becomes an adventure in the unexpected. As Maggie and Ira navigate the riotous twists and turns, they intersect with an assorted cast of eccentrics–and rediscover the magic of the road called life and the joy of having somebody next to you to share the ride . . . bumps and all.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - suztales - LibraryThing

I have owned this book for a long time. When i picked it up a couple of weeks ago, I assumed I would be reading it for the second time. But I didn't recognize anything -- not the characters, not the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - moonshineandrosefire - LibraryThing

Maggie and Ira Moran have been married for twenty-eight years and it shows. Maggie is an easy-going free spirit: impetuous, reckless and unpredictable. Her husband Ira is Maggie's polar opposite ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
47
Section 3
76
Section 4
125
Section 5
176
Section 6
215
Section 7
244
Section 8
248
Section 9
279
Section 10
313
Section 11
325
Section 12
329
Section 13
337
Section 14
340
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Novelist and short-story writer Anne Tyler was born in Minnesota, grew up in North Carolina, and was educated at Duke University. Since 1965 she has lived in Baltimore, the setting for much of her work. With wry humor and sympathy, Tyler writes about the ambivalence of family relations, focusing on ordinary characters, most of whom live in Baltimore or in small Southern towns. Her concerns are with the human need to belong and to be loved, the necessity of making imperfect choices, and the acceptance of mortality. Beginning with her ninth novel, Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (1982), which won the PEN Faulkner Award, Tyler has gained the wider audience she deserves. This novel shows Tyler's development as a writer: here, she is able to delineate family tensions over several generations. Tyler's feel for the oddities of families and the strange configurations of which they are made comes through vividly in The Accidental Tourist (1985).

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