The Twelfth-Century Renaissance

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, Sep 11, 1999 - History - 240 pages
1 Review
This volume surveys the wide range of cultural and intellectual changes in western Europe in the period 1050-1250. The Twelfth-Century Renaissance first establishes the broader context for the changes and introduces the debate on the validity of the term "Renaissance" as a label for the period. Summarizing current scholarship, without imposing a particular interpretation of the issues, the book provides an accessible introduction to a vibrant and vital period in Europe’s cultural and intellectual history.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Debates and contexts
1
Educational structures
12
legacies imports memories
40
Law politics and government
66
philosophy and theology humanism and individualism
103
The arts vernacular literature and music
152
A renaissance for women?
188
Towards a conclusion
207
Further reading
215
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 223 - Jaroslav Pelikan, The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, vol.
Page 224 - The Court of Champagne as a Literary Center," Speculum 36 (1961): 551-591, and Rita Lejeune, "Role litteraire de la famille d'Alienor d'Aquitaine,

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

R.N. Swanson is Reader in Medieval Church History at the University of Birmingham.

Bibliographic information