Slavery in Alabama

Front Cover
University of Alabama Press, Jun 30, 1994 - History - 426 pages

Since its initial publication in 1950, Slavery in Alabama remains the only comprehensive statewide study of the institution of slavery in Alabama. Sellers concentrates on examining the social and economic aspects of how slavery operated in the state. After a brief discussion of slavery under imperial rulers of the colonial and territorial periods, Sellers focuses on the transplantation of the slavery system from the Atlantic seaboard states to Alabama.

Sellers used the primary sources available to him, including government documents, county and city records, personal papers, church records, and newspapers. His discussions of the church and the slave, and his treatment of the proslavery defense, deepen the comprehensiveness of his study. His two sections of photographs are special touches showing former slaves and churches with slave galleries.

 

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very good book very intersting i learned alot by reading this book

Contents

1 In the Colonial and Territorial Periods
1
2 Plantation and Planters
19
Overseer and Slave
44
4 The Slave and the Plantation
81
5 Traffic in Slaves
141
6 Hired Slave and Town Slave
195
7 The Legal Status of the Slave
215
8 Crimes and Punishments of Slaves
242
9 Runaways
266
10 The Church and the Slave
294
11 The Defense of Slavery
332
12 The Free Negro in Alabama Before 1865
361
Bibliography
399
Index
411
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

James Benson Sellers (1889-1964) served as Professor of History at The University of Alabama. Harriet E. Amos Doss is Associate Professor of History at The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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