A historical and genealogical memoir of the O'Connors, kings of Connaught, and their descendants. [With] Appendix

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1861
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Page 67 - ... beggar was his guest, Whose beard descending swept his aged breast ; The ruin'd spendthrift, now no longer proud, Claim'd kindred there, and had his claims allow'd ; The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay, Sat by his fire, and talk'd the night away ; Wept o'er his wounds, or, talcs of sorrow done, Shoulder'd his crutch, and show'd how fields were won...
Page vi - In reference to nobility in individuals, nothing was ever better said than by Bishop Warburton — as is reported — in the House of Lords, on the occasion of some angry dispute which had arisen between a peer of noble family and one of a new creation. He said that, ' High birth was a thing which he never knew any one disparage, except those who had it not ; and he never knew any one make a boast of it who had anything else to be proud of.
Page 12 - ... ploughing was going on." A famine also occurred, and was followed by severe sickness. Well might the friar historian exclaim : " Woeful was the misfortune which God permitted to fall upon the west province in Ireland at that time ; for the young warriors did not spare each other, but preyed and plundered to the utmost of their power. Women and children, the feeble and the lowly poor, perished by cold and famine in this year."3 O'Neill had inaugurated Turlough at Carnfree.4 He appears to have...
Page iii - Irish, a little stroke being set over the letter instead of it, thus n we find this manner was familiar to the Latins in ancient times, and by the ignorance of some copyists and engravers, has made many words dubious ; for they often omitted n where they should always write it, as clemeti for dementi, cojux for conju.c.
Page 24 - This extensive territory comprised, according to O'Flaherty and others, a great part of South Connaught in the present County Galway, and was afterwards extended beyond the river Suck to the Shannon, in the south of Eoscommon.
Page 16 - O'Connor, the defender and supporter of his own province, and of his friends on every side, the expeller and plunderer of his foes ; a man full of hospitality, prowess, and renown ; the exalter of the clerical orders and men of science ; a worthy materies...
Page xii - O'Conors of Connacht wrote to Lord Clanricarde, Jan. 23, 1641 — g, entreating that he would *' unite with them, in one right way, " faithfully and loyally to serve God, the King,
Page 69 - Dublin Militia, who was killed at the battle of Ross, in 1798.
Page iii - ... is rarely written in Irish, a little stroke being set over the letter instead of it, thus (-). We find this manner was familiar to the Latins in ancient times, and by the ignorance of some copyists and engravers, has made many words dubious; for they often omitted n when they should always write it, as Clemeti for dementi ; Cojux for Conjux. The Greeks, in like manner, omitted v in some...
Page 58 - Doctor come forward in the first quarter of the nineteenth century to humbug antiquarians with such forgeries as the preceding;* but any paltry shift to support a theory by which one makes himself famous or notorious: my only ambition is to be known to posterity as a detester of forgers, fabricators, and liars ; and more particularly...

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