The Life and Pontificate of Leo the Tenth, Volume 2

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J. McCreery, 1805 - Popes
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Page 238 - Having a most earnest desire to promote the study of the Greek language and of Grecian literature, which are now almost extinct, and to encourage the liberal arts as far as lies in my power, and being well convinced of your great learning and singular judgment, I request that you will take the trouble of inviting from Greece ten young men, or as many more as you may think proper, of good education, and virtuous disposition ; who may compose a seminary of liberal studies, and from whom the Italians...
Page 92 - Gods name leave off our attempts against the Terra firma. The natural Situation of Islands seems not to sort with Conquests in that Kind. England alone is a just Empire. Or when we would enlarge ourselves let it be that way we can, and to which it seems the eternal Providence hath destined us, which is by Sea.
Page 282 - On being informed that Sante Pagnini, a learned ecclesiastic then in Rome, had undertaken to translate the Bible from the original Hebrew, Leo sent to him and requested to be allowed the inspection of his work. The satisfaction which he derived from it was such that he immediately ordered that the whole should be transcribed at his own expense, and gave directions that materials should be provided for printing it. A part of it was accordingly executed, but the death of the pontiff retarded its completion,...
Page 255 - Ghisi, as he is variously named, was a native of Siena, who having frequent occasion, in his mercantile concerns, to resort to Rome, at length fixed his abode there, and erected for himself a splendid mansion in the Transtevere, which he decorated with works in painting and sculpture by the greatest artists of the time.* He had long been considered as the wealthiest merchant in Italy, and on the expedition of Charles VIII. against the kingdom of 'Naples, had advanced for the use of that monarch a...
Page 165 - ... after •which, if it appear that any one of the cardinals has twothirds of the votes in his favour, he is declared to be canonically elected pope. When, however, after repeated trials, this does not occur, a new proceeding takes place, which is called election by access ; in which any cardinal may accede to the vote of another, by an alteration of his ticket in a prescribed form. When by these means the choice of a pontiff is effected, the tickets are prudently committed to the flames, to prevent...
Page 280 - Rome until 1512, at the opening of the fifth session of the Lateran council. The great number of ecclesiastics from Syria, Ethiopia, and other parts of the East, who attended that council, afforded him an opportunity of prosecuting his studies with advantage : and at the request of the cardinal Santa Croce, he was employed as the person best qualified to translate from the Chaldean into Latin the liturgy of the eastern clergy, previously to the use of it being expressly sanctioned by the pope. After...
Page 152 - ... on the proudest sovereigns of the earth. His ambition was not, however, the passion of a grovelling mind, nor were the advantages which he sought to attain of a temporary or personal nature. To establish the authority of the holy see throughout Europe, to recover the dominions of the church, to expel all foreign powers, or, as they were then called, barbarians, from Italy, and to restore that country to the dominion of its native princes, were the vast objects of his comprehensive mind. These...
Page 164 - ... this power in future to any of their number, without such restrictions as might effectually prevent the recurrence of a similar event. In choosing a pope by scrutiny, the cardinals each write their own name, with that of the person whom they wish to recommend, on a billet...
Page 164 - There are four different modes of electing the supreme pontiff; by inspiration, by compromise, by scrutiny, and by access.* An election by inspiration is effected by several of the cardinals calling aloud, as by a sudden impulse, the name of the person whom they wish to raise to the pontifical dignity. This method of resorting to the pretext of supernatural aid is seldom relied on, except when all human means have failed of success. If, however, a powerful party can be raised, and their efforts happen...
Page 23 - Courageous, magnificent, eloquent^ and accomplished in all the exercises of arts and arms, he raised an admiration of his endowments which kept pace with and counter-balanced the abhorrence excited by his crimes. That even these crimes have been exaggerated, is highly probable. His enemies were numerous, and the certainty of his guilt in some instances gave credibility to every imputation that could be devised against him. That he retained, even after he had survived his prosperity, no inconsiderable...

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